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I was reading (and am still learning) about the difference between the EXISTS and IN operators in SQL. Is it possible to change the following statement so it uses an EXISTS rather than IN? I've tried but the query is taking a very long time to complete. So I'm obviously doing something wrong.

In the below example would it be more efficient to use EXISTS instead of IN? There would be no more than 10 OperationRecordID records returned from the current sub-query used for the IN statement.

SELECT SPAS.SessionRecordID,
       ( SELECT MIN(TimeValue) AS MinAnaes
           FROM tblTMActualTimes TMAT
          WHERE OperationRecordID IN
                 ( SELECT OperationRecordID
                     FROM tblTMActualOperation TMAO
                    WHERE TMAO.SessionRecordID = SPAS.SessionRecordID
                 )
            AND CFTimeDefinitionID = 'INTOANS'
       ) AS FirstAnaesthetic
  FROM tblSPActualSession SPAS
share|improve this question
    
Which DBMS (Oracle/PostgreSQL/MySQL/SQL Server/...) are you using? –  ruakh Feb 20 '12 at 17:57
    
Having thought about this again, instead of using the IN sub-query I could perform a JOIN in the original sub-query instead. Though I'm curious which is considered best practice/most efficient. –  mheptinstall Feb 20 '12 at 17:58
    
SQL is a declarative language, the query optimizer is free to rewrite in to exists or the other way round. Which is more efficient depends on a lot of things (database, statistics, indexes) but not on the way you phrase the question in SQL. –  Andomar Feb 20 '12 at 17:58
    
I am using MSSQL Server 2005. –  mheptinstall Feb 20 '12 at 17:59
    
In the abstract, I think EXISTS probably makes more logical sense for this case than either IN or JOIN. But you're asking about efficiency -- you even use the phrase "best practice/most efficient" as though that's one thing -- and that will most likely depend on the DBMS you're using, and on the specific version of the DBMS. On MySQL, for example, I think that IN and EXISTS will both be much slower than a JOIN, because it doesn't have good optimizations for correlated IN/EXISTS subqueries (though that may have changed in versions newer than when I last looked at it). –  ruakh Feb 20 '12 at 18:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As said in the comments it depends on the data what is more suitable for the situation. But if you what to do it in an exist you can do it something like this:

SELECT 
    SPAS.SessionRecordID,
    ( 
        SELECT 
            MIN(TimeValue) AS MinAnaes
        FROM tblTMActualTimes TMAT
        WHERE EXISTS
                 ( 
                    SELECT 
                        NULL
                    FROM 
                        tblTMActualOperation TMAO
                    WHERE 
                        TMAO.SessionRecordID = SPAS.SessionRecordID
                        AND TMAT.OperationRecordID=TMAO.OperationRecordID
                 )
            AND CFTimeDefinitionID = 'INTOANS'
       ) AS FirstAnaesthetic
  FROM 
    tblSPActualSession SPAS
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I think I was missing "AND TMAT.OperationRecordID=TMAO.OperationRecordID" when I tried it earlier. Will test it out tomorrow. –  mheptinstall Feb 20 '12 at 18:08
    
Glad to help. If you are fine with the answer you might consider accepting it.. –  Arion Feb 20 '12 at 18:14

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