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I'm using MySQL. Tables engine is MyIsam

Which method is faster?

DELETE FROM TABLE WHERE id IN (1,2,3);

or

DELETE FROM TABLE WHERE id = 1; 
DELETE FROM TABLE WHERE id = 2;
DELETE FROM TABLE WHERE id = 3;

id field is the PRIMARY KEY

Which one will work faster?

share|improve this question
3  
Why don't you just try? – a_horse_with_no_name Feb 20 '12 at 18:06
1  
Whenever you want to ask is x faster than y the first course of action is to benchmark it for yourself! – Michael Berkowski Feb 20 '12 at 18:06
    
Definitly using IN. – Bartosz Grzybowski Feb 20 '12 at 18:06
    
The first. At least because there's less communication between server and client. – lorenzo-s Feb 20 '12 at 18:06
    
Make a loop and test it, it'll take you five seconds. IMHO I bet on that the first one is faster, but it won't be a lot faster since there might be an index on your id column. – AsTeR Feb 20 '12 at 18:07
up vote 5 down vote accepted

IN should be faster, because mysql will update your indexes and move data blocks after every query in your second solution, while it will happen only once with the first query.

And here are some tests on MySQL (for a table having one int column and 3 varchars, populated with random data and on index on a column in the WHERE...makes no sense without index, because it takes a lot more time in both cases...but still a loooot slower with 3 queries than IN).

mysql> call prepare_data();
Query OK, 1 row affected (34.25 sec)

mysql> delete from t1 where trt in (5, 6, 7);
Query OK, 300049 rows affected (5.25 sec)

mysql> call prepare_data();
Query OK, 1 row affected (35.18 sec)

mysql> delete from t1 where trt=5;delete from t1 where trt=6;delete from t1 where trt=7;
Query OK, 99961 rows affected (2.25 sec)

Query OK, 99842 rows affected (2.38 sec)

Query OK, 99558 rows affected (2.69 sec)

mysql> 

So, those three queries, took a lot more time 7.39s vs 5.25s for IN, which is a 40% increase). Here is prepare_data procedure:

DELIMITER $$
CREATE PROCEDURE prepare_data()
BEGIN
  DECLARE i INT DEFAULT 0;
  TRUNCATE TABLE t1;
  WHILE i < 1000000 DO
    INSERT INTO t1 (a, b, c, trt) VALUES ('fasdfadsf', 'asdfasdfa', 'asdfasdf', FLOOR( 1 + RAND( ) *10 ));
    SET i = i + 1;
  END WHILE;
END $$
DELIMITER ;
share|improve this answer
3  
And less round trips between server/client and less table locks (MyISAM). – Marcus Adams Feb 20 '12 at 18:34
2  
And the database engine will parse one query instead of three. – Benoit Feb 20 '12 at 18:37

SQL Server 2008 R2 Express, IBM t60p laptop, Core Duo T2500 2.0GHz CPU, 7200rpm HDD

100000 rows (no index on col2, col1 with id, col2 with random number between 0 and 10)

TEST 1: three queries

  1. Insert 100000 random rows (40 sec)
  2. Tested query (250ms)
  3. Truncate table
  4. Insert 100000 random rows. (38 sec)
  5. Tested query (253ms)
  6. Truncate table
  7. Insert 100000 random rows. (39 sec)
  8. Tested query (253ms)
  9. Truncate table

TEST 2: single query

  1. Insert 100000 random rows (37 sec)
  2. Tested query (343ms)
  3. Truncate table
  4. Insert 100000 random rows. (39 sec)
  5. Tested query (327ms)
  6. Truncate table
  7. Insert 100000 random rows. (38 sec)
  8. Tested query (313ms)

Query used for inserts:

    truncate table testTable

    DECLARE @counter int, @col2 int


    SELECT @counter=0, @col2=RAND(@@spid + cpu + physical_io)
    FROM master..sysprocesses where spid=@@spid

    WHILE (@counter < 1000000)
         BEGIN
         SELECT @counter=@counter + 10,   
         @col2= CONVERT(int, RAND() * 100) % 10


        INSERT testTable VALUES (@counter, @col2)
    END

Query used for measure:

    DECLARE @StartTime datetime,@EndTime datetime
    SELECT @StartTime=GETDATE()

    DELETE FROM testTable WHERE col2 = 7;
    DELETE FROM testTable WHERE col2 = 8;
    DELETE FROM testTable WHERE col2 = 9;
    --DELETE FROM testTable where col2 in (7,8,9);


    SELECT @EndTime=GETDATE()

    SELECT DATEDIFF(ms,@StartTime,@EndTime) AS [Duration in microseconds]
share|improve this answer
    
This is not equal to what the OP has. He is deleting what in your case is col1. Since you have no index on col2 - you'll end up with crap performance. Try do this again using col1 values as predicate. – cairnz Feb 20 '12 at 19:14
    
I cant catch so small time... – Kamil Feb 20 '12 at 19:39
    
Kamil, your test is not related to a question. Question is for MyISAM database engine, while you are using MS SQL Server. There is a huge difference between those two database engines. – Aleksandar Vucetic Feb 20 '12 at 21:04

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