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If I have an abstract class like this:

public abstract class Item
{
    private Integer value;
    public Item()
    {
        value=new Integer(0);
    }
    public Item(Integer value)
    {
        this.value=new Integer();
    }
}

And some classes deriving from Item like this:

public class Pencil extends Item
{
    public Pencil()
    {
        super();
    }
    public Pencil(Integer value)
    {
        super(value);
    }
}

I have not understood why I can't call the constructor using a generic:

public class Box <T extends Item>
{
    T item;
    public Box()
    {
        item=new T(); // here I get the error
    }
}

I know that is possible to have a type which hasn't a constructor, but this case is impossible because Pencil has the constructor without parameters, and Item is abstract. But I get this error from eclipse: cannot instanciate the type T
I don't understand why, and how to avoid this?

share|improve this question
    
Consider the case when you have another class that extends Item, except this class has only one constructor that insists on at least one argument. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 20 '12 at 18:36
    
possible duplicate of How can I instantiate a generic type in Java? –  Lukas Eder Jul 22 '12 at 12:23
    
possible duplicate of Create instance of generic type in Java? –  A.H. Jul 23 '12 at 13:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is no way to use the Java type system to enforce that a class hierarchy has a uniform signature for the constructors of its subclasses.

Consider:

public class ColorPencil extends Pencil
{
    private Color color;

    public ColorPencil(Color color)
    {
        super();
        this.color=color;
    }   
}

This makes ColorPencil a valid T (it extends Item). However, there is no no-arg constructor for this type. Hence, T() is nonsensical.

To do what you want, you need to use reflection. You can't benefit from compile-time error checking.

share|improve this answer

This is because Java uses erasure to implement generics, see this:

To quote the relevant parts from the above Wikipedia article:

Generics are checked at compile-time for type-correctness. The generic type information is then removed in a process called type erasure.

As a result of type erasure, type parameters cannot be determined at run-time.

Consequently, instantiating a Java class of a parameterized type is impossible because instantiation requires a call to a constructor, which is unavailable if the type is unknown.

You can go around this by actually providing the class yourself. This is well explained here:

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T is an alias for the actual type your class will handle, for example if you instantiate Box<Item> then T is really just an alias for Item. As you declare T extends Item then you know that T will have at least the same interface as Item, so you can treat it like one.

I think what you really want to do is not instantiate the item field in Box, but instead implement a couple of methods to let you manipulate that field.

public class Box<T extends Item> {
    private T item;

    public T getItem() {
        return this.item;
    }

    public void setItem(T item) {
        return this.item = item;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Because at runtime the type of T is unknown.

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