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In order to make websites more accessible I have been encouraged to use HTML5 tags <header>, <footer>, etc... to only surround the actual content, but I have a feeling that I might be doing something wrong.

An example body:

<header>
    <div class="center">
        <h1>Title</h1>
        <nav>
            ...
        </nav>
    </div>
</header>
<div>
    <section>
        ...
    </section>
</div>
<footer>
    <div class="center">
        ...
    </div>
</footer>

.center {
   max-width: 70em;
   margin: 0 auto;
}

header {
   width: 100%
   background-color: red;
}

footer {
   width: 100%
   background-color: green;
}

body > div {
   width: 100%
   background-color: blue;
}

Is it actually better like this?

<div id="head">
    <header>
        <h1>Title</h1>
        <nav>
            ...
        </nav>
    </header>
</div>
<div>
    <section>
        ...
    </section>
</div>
<div id="foot">
    <footer>
        ...
    </footer>
</div>
share|improve this question
    
What is that div inside the header/footer/section for? Is it necessary for some reason? –  MarcinJuraszek Feb 20 '12 at 18:24
    
@MarcinJurazek: Its to center the content within the header....the header style is a whole bar across the screen....but I want the content to be in the middle of that bar when the browser is resized. –  Cheetah Feb 20 '12 at 18:25
    
Why can't you use body and center header/section/footer within it? –  MarcinJuraszek Feb 20 '12 at 18:28
    
Because the header/section/footer currently style the page (different styles for each tag). The style goes across 100% of the width of the page....the content is then centered in that. –  Cheetah Feb 20 '12 at 18:29
    
but body is going across 100% of the page width as well :) There is no change between sematic of the markup with or without that div (or the position of them). It's just much more elegant not to use them unless they are really necessary and you are not able to get the same effect without them. –  MarcinJuraszek Feb 20 '12 at 18:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As for what is better — DIV inside structural elements like HEADER/FOOTER or structural elements inside DIV, it does not matter since DIV is common container without any semantic sense at all.

What is really unsemantic/bad-practice in your first example is center class name. Class names should reflect purpose of block (content, products, etc.), not its presentation (center, red, etc.).

share|improve this answer

Basically, that div elements are not required semantically speaking (maybe you need them for styling?).

div is an element without semantic (as its counterpart for inline elements span) and you have to use them where there isn't anything better. Even if you give them some semantic with its id attribute, that semantic is only known by you and not for, for example, any web search motor (google) or any screen reader (for blind people, for example), because there aren't any definitive conventions about id or class values.

If you use header, footer etc, you are giving them semantics. Maybe you want to increase their semantic using some value for the role attribute.

By the way, that section surely it isn't needed. Look at what people from HTML5 Doctor say:

In HTML 5 you can specifically mark up all the “secondary” content on a page such as navigation, branding, copyright notices, so it feels odd that you can’t specifically mark up the most important part of your page—the content.

But what would be the purpose of marking it up specifically, anyway? If you need to style it, use a div. An assistive technlogy like a screenreader can find the main content because it is the first thing inside a page that isn’t a header, nav or footer.

With a <div role="main"> you have everything you need.

share|improve this answer

It'd be better like this:

<header>
    <h1>Title</h1>
    <nav>
        ...
    </nav>
</header>
<section>
    ...
</section>
<footer>
    ...
</footer>

Or alternatively:

<div class="header">
    <h1>Title</h1>
    <div class="nav">
        ...
    </div>
</div>
<div class="section">
    ...
</div>
<div class="footer">
    ...
</div>

Why are you being told to add those extra wrapper div elements?

share|improve this answer
    
See edit, the DIVs were for style. –  Cheetah Feb 20 '12 at 18:39
    
@Ben Why not just style the existing elements? –  robertc Feb 20 '12 at 18:41
    
Not sure what you mean, did you see the added CSS in the OP? –  Cheetah Feb 20 '12 at 18:48
    
@Ben If you're adding elements purely to support styling (ie. they are non-semantic) then worrying about which is the most semantic way to add them is pointless. There is no 'semantic way' to add non-semantic elements. –  robertc Feb 20 '12 at 18:51

Try

<section>
  <header> head content </header>
  main content
  <footer> footer content </footer>
</section>

This get's rid of all those silly divs and now you have your header and footer linked to your section like they should be.

share|improve this answer
    
Not what I was aiming for. The code provided is in the body tag...the DIVS are there for centering the content in the styled header/footer tags –  Cheetah Feb 20 '12 at 18:55
    
@Ben then add that class to the <header> and <footer> –  Raynos Feb 20 '12 at 18:57
    
What class are you talking about? –  Cheetah Feb 20 '12 at 19:04
    
header and footer don't need to be linked to a section, they can be a header and footer for the whole page. –  robertc Feb 20 '12 at 19:06
    
@robertc indeed they can, I assumed they would not be. –  Raynos Feb 20 '12 at 19:19

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