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Say we have a list of dictionaries in Python:

A = [{'x': 1, 'y': 2, 'z': 3},{'x': 0, 'y': 10, 'z': 11}]

We pick out the 'x'-values using map()

x = map((lambda i: i['x']), A)

and do something with them. Now, what is the cleanest way to update all the 'x'-values of A in a comparable way - ie., without using a for-loop?

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1  
Why wouldn't you want to use a loop? –  Marcin Feb 20 '12 at 18:38
    
Seeing that the scenario is not comparable (mapping a list vs. updating a list), I don't see what the advantage of not using a for loop would be here. –  Niklas B. Feb 20 '12 at 18:47
    
The reason for not using a for-loop: it's part of a parallel computing class. Remove as many loops as possible... Thanks for the answers! –  trolle3000 Feb 20 '12 at 19:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In a single line?

map(lambda (i,v) : A[i].update(v), enumerate(map((lambda i: {'x':i['x'] + 1}), A)))

Where, in this case, you're incrementing the value of X. Although I'd suggest that this isn't the prettiest way to do anything, nor the most readable. At least by doing the update method you're not relying on a 'hidden' internal like setitem, and it's a little more flexible in that you could be doing changes to more than one key at a time.

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>>> r = [{'x': 1, 'y': 2, 'z': 3},{'x': 0, 'y': 10, 'z': 11}]
>>> r
[{'y': 2, 'x': 1, 'z': 3}, {'y': 10, 'x': 0, 'z': 11}]

>>> [i.__setitem__('x', 10) for i in r]
[None, None]
>>> r
[{'y': 2, 'x': 10, 'z': 3}, {'y': 10, 'x': 10, 'z': 11}]

It's not horrible, but I think a for loop would be nicer. I'd only do this if 'r' were really large and performance is super important.

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>>> map((lambda i: i.__setitem__('x',10)), A)
[None, None]
>>> A
[{'y': 2, 'x': 10, 'z': 3}, {'y': 10, 'x': 10, 'z': 11}]

But this is ugly. And I would use for-loop.

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Let X be a list of the updated values for "x":

while X:
    A[len(X)]['x'] = X.pop()
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If you first extracted all the 'x' values into a list as shown, you could update them like this:

A = [{'x': 1, 'y': 2, 'z': 3},{'x': 0, 'y': 10, 'z': 11}]

x = map((lambda i: i['x']), A)

def do_something(x):
    return x+1

print A
# [{'y': 2, 'x': 1, 'z': 3}, {'y': 10, 'x': 0, 'z': 11}]

map((lambda i,v: i.__setitem__('x', do_something(v))), A, x)

print A
# [{'y': 2, 'x': 2, 'z': 3}, {'y': 10, 'x': 1, 'z': 11}]

However the same result could be obtained more efficiently with the following which doesn't need all the 'x' values to first be extracted into a separate list:

map((lambda i: (i.__setitem__('x', do_something(i['x'])))), A)
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