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How do i declare a 2d array using new?

Like, for a "normal" array I would:

int* ary = new int[Size]

but

int** ary = new int[sizeY][sizeX]

a) doesn't work/compile and b) doesn't accomplish what:

int ary[sizeY][sizeX] 

does.

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12  
It only works if sizeX is constant: int(*ary)[sizeX] = new int[sizeY][sizeX]; Which is the right way to create a int[sizeY][sizeX] and where all the memory is contiguous. (I don't think this is worth an answer, since probably your sizeX is not constant –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 1 '09 at 20:49
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12 Answers 12

up vote 148 down vote accepted

A dynamic 2D array is basically an array of pointers to arrays. You should initialize it using a loop:

int** ary = new int*[sizeX];
for(int i = 0; i < sizeX; ++i)
    ary[i] = new int[sizeY];

The above, for sizeX = 4 and sizeY = 5, would produce the following:

enter image description here

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46  
Remember that anything allocated with new is created on the heap and must be de-allocated with delete, just keep this in mind and be sure to delete this memory from the heap when you're done with it to prevent leaks. –  Kekoa Jun 1 '09 at 20:51
14  
Also note that this one is an array of pointers. not of arrays. The pointer in turn point to arrays. Important to really correct on the terms, since many tutorials get it wrong too. An array of arrays would be contiguous, which this one is not –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 1 '09 at 20:53
    
@litb: Is a[][] considered an "array of arrays" in spec or a multidimensional array? –  Mehrdad Afshari Jun 1 '09 at 20:55
3  
Yes, a T[][N] would be called "array of array [N] of T" and be an incomplete type, while T[][] would be an invalid type (all except the last dimensions must have a known size). T[N][M] is "array [N] of array[M] of T", while yours, T[sizeX] is "array [sizeX] of T" where T is a pointer to an int. Creating a dynamically 2d array works like this: new int[X][Y]. It will create an array of an allocated-type int[X][Y]. This is a "hole" in C++'s type system, since the ordinary type system of C++ doesn't have array dimensions with sizes not known at compile time, thus these are called "allocated types" –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 1 '09 at 21:00
1  
More to the point, "array of arrays" and "multidimensional array" is one and the same thing. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 1 '09 at 21:00
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int** ary = new int[sizeY][sizeX]

should be:

int **ary = new int*[sizeY];
for(int i = 0; i < sizeY; ++i) {
    ary[i] = new int[sizeX];
}

and then clean up would be:

for(int i = 0; i < sizeY; ++i) {
    delete [] ary[i];
}
delete [] ary;

EDIT: as Dietrich Epp pointed out in the comments this is not exactly a light weight solution. An alternative approach would be to use one large block of memory:

int *ary = new int[sizeX*sizeY];

// ary[i][j] is then rewritten as
ary[i*sizeY+j]
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24  
+1 for showing the cleanup code too –  Herms Jun 1 '09 at 20:58
13  
It's a little heavier weight than it needs to be, and it allocates more blocks than you need. Multidimensional arrays only need one block of memory, they don't need one block per row. Allocating only one block makes cleanup simpler too. –  Dietrich Epp Jun 1 '09 at 21:35
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Don't.

Unless you have good reason, use std::vector<std::vector<int> > instead. Memory management will be far less error prone.

Edit:

If you start to run into issues with the memory being non-contiguous, such as pointed out in the comments by Dietrich Epp, you could switch to using std::vector<int> and allocate (rows * columns) elements.

You can then get a hold of the first element of this vector (&v[0]) and use the techniques in the other answers to treat it as a normal int[][].

However I would only do this if you actually profiled your code and saw that the non-contiguous memory was causing performance problems. It would likely only be an issue if you had a very large 2-D array. At least that is my guess. Again, profiling is the only real way to know.

The main point of my answer was to let vector do the memory management for you.

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4  
i second that: after working months with geographical (2D) data. –  ivanTheTerrible Jun 1 '09 at 20:57
1  
Definitely, this is the way to go in real world apps unless you have an excuse. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jun 1 '09 at 21:00
3  
And speed isn't an excuse either. Vectors are just as fast as arrays under almost all circumstances, especially if you know the size in advance and pre-allocate it on construction, or using reserve(). –  Tyler McHenry Jun 1 '09 at 21:03
14  
vector<vector<int> > is a little weird. In this case, vectors will NOT be as fast as arrays and allocation will certainly be much slower. If you allocate a 1024*1024 array this way, you will end up with making 1025 allocations instead of just one. You'll end up with more fragmentation, less locality of reference, and more overhead. –  Dietrich Epp Jun 1 '09 at 21:31
1  
@Dietrich Epp - vector will be just as fast as native arrays. The OP didn't specify his sizes, so it may be just fine for his use case. I agree that 1024 * 1024 might suffer some of the problems you described, but this would have to be profiled to see if it mattered for his application. –  Brian Neal Jun 2 '09 at 1:33
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In C++11 it is possible:

auto array = new double[M][N]; 

This way, the memory is not initialized. To initialize it do this instead:

auto array = new double[M][N]();

Sample program (compile with "g++ -std=c++11"):

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>
#include <type_traits>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <cxxabi.h>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    const auto M = 2;
    const auto N = 2;

    // allocate (no initializatoin)
    auto array = new double[M][N];

    // pollute the memory
    array[0][0] = 2;
    array[1][0] = 3;
    array[0][1] = 4;
    array[1][1] = 5;

    // re-allocate, probably will fetch the same memory block (not portable)
    delete[] array;
    array = new double[M][N];

    // show that memory is not initialized
    for(int r = 0; r < M; r++)
    {
        for(int c = 0; c < N; c++)
            cout << array[r][c] << " ";
        cout << endl;
    }
    cout << endl;

    delete[] array;

    // the propoer way to zero-initilize the array
    array = new double[M][N]();

    // show the memory is initialized
    for(int r = 0; r < M; r++)
    {
        for(int c = 0; c < N; c++)
            cout << array[r][c] << " ";
        cout << endl;
    }

    int info;
    cout << abi::__cxa_demangle(typeid(array).name(),0,0,&info) << endl;

    return 0;
}

Output:

2 4 
3 5 

0 0 
0 0 
double (*) [2]
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I need to do this in a class, hence I can't use auto. What would be the proper type for the array? –  Peter Smit May 27 '13 at 14:38
    
Can you use this then: using arr2d = double(*)[2]; arr2d array = new double[M][N]; –  M. Alaggan May 27 '13 at 17:06
1  
+1: this is what the OP asked for. The proper type for this is either double (*)[M][N] or double(*)[][N] with M, N being constant expressions. –  Fozi Sep 30 '13 at 18:09
1  
Problem with this solution is that the dimensions cannot be a run-time value, but should be known at compile-time. –  legends2k Oct 26 '13 at 14:18
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I presume from your static array example that you want a rectangular array, and not a jagged one. You can use the following:

int *ary = new int[sizeX * sizeY];

Then you can access elements as:

ary[y*sizeX + x]

Don't forget to use delete[] on ary.

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This is a good way to do it. You can also do vector<int> with size sizeX*sizeY for some nice extra safety. –  Dietrich Epp Jun 1 '09 at 21:34
1  
The best thing is to wrap this code in a class - you can perform a clean-up in destructor and you can implements methods get(x, y) and set(x,y, val) instead of forcing user to do multiplication by himself. Implementing operator[] is more tricky, but I believe it's possible. –  Tadeusz Kopec Jun 2 '09 at 14:48
1  
Nice and contiguous! –  Mike T Aug 30 '12 at 0:44
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This question was bugging me - it's a common enough problem that a good solution should already exist, something better than the vector of vectors or rolling your own array indexing.

When something ought to exist in C++ but doesn't, the first place to look is boost.org. There I found the Boost Multidimensional Array Library, multi_array. It even includes a multi_array_ref class that can be used to wrap your own one-dimensional array buffer.

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I recommend reading what C++ FAQ Lite says on the subject. Allocating (and more importantly, properly freeing) a multi-dimensional array using new can be tricky. Also, the next three FAQs in sequence from the one I linked are a good read. They'll give you tips on how to turn your array into its own class (enabling RAII, among other things), and an introduction to genericity using templates.

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How to allocate a contiguous multidimensional array in C++ ?

It seems the problem come from operator new []. Make sure you use operator new instead :

double (* in)[n][n] = new (double[m][n][n]);

And that's all : you get a C-compatible multidimensional array...

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2  
Does not work if n is not a constant. –  jbo5112 Aug 27 '13 at 3:46
    
@jbo5112 Oh, yes, it does work, even when the dimensions are not constant. Just tried it: int* foo(int m, int n, int o) { int (*array)[n][o] = new (int[m][n][o]); return **array; } compiles (and runs) without a single warning... –  cmaster Sep 30 '13 at 18:50
    
What compiler are you using? The array syntax compiles and runs fine with g++ 4.6.4 and 4.7.3. I'm just getting a warning on the last ] before the = that "value computed is not used" or "statement has no effect". However, if I use g++ 4.8.1 (supposedly fully c++11 compliant), it throws errors on n and o not being constant "array size in operator new must be constant", and points to the last ] in the line. –  jbo5112 Oct 1 '13 at 4:59
1  
@jbo5112 I didn't see your last comment until now, because you didn't include @cmaster in it, otherwise I would have responded more promptly... Anyway, I apologize that I seem to have made some mistake in my last comment (I really don't know how that could happen), the requirement of constant array dimension is indeed part of all C++ standards gcc knows about. Here is a workaround for C++: double (*in)[n][n] = (double (*)[n][n])new double[m*n*n]; –  cmaster Dec 2 '13 at 21:53
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Try doing this:

int **ary = new int[sizeY];
for (int i = 0; i < sizeY; i++)
    ary[i] = new int[sizeX];
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typedef is your friend

In C++ using new:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

typedef double (array5k_t)[5000];

array5k_t *array5k = new array5k_t[5000];

array5k[4999][4999] = 10;
printf("array5k[4999][4999] == %f\n", array5k[4999][4999]);

return 0;
}

Or C style using calloc:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

typedef double (*array5k_t)[5000];

array5k_t array5k = calloc(5000, sizeof(double)*5000);

array5k[4999][4999] = 10;
printf("array5k[4999][4999] == %f\n", array5k[4999][4999]);

return 0;
}
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1  
Accessing beyond the end of an array is not guaranteed to cause an error. If you're lucky, the program will just crash. You're definitely in the realm of undefined behavior. –  Michael Kristofik Jun 1 '09 at 21:18
    
True, although the purpose of this example is really just to show how to use typedef and new together to declare a 2D array. –  Robert S. Barnes Jun 1 '09 at 21:22
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declaring 2D array dynamically:

    #include<iostream>
    using namespace std;
    int main()
    {
        int x = 3, y = 3;

        int **ptr = new int *[x];

        for(int i = 0; i<y; i++)
        {
            ptr[i] = new int[y];
        }
        srand(time(0));

        for(int j = 0; j<x; j++)
        {
            for(int k = 0; k<y; k++)
            {
                int a = rand()%10;
                ptr[j][k] = a;
                cout<<ptr[j][k]<<" ";
            }
            cout<<endl;
        }
    }

Now in the above code we took a double pointer and assigned it a dynamic memory and gave a value of the columns. Here the memory allocated is only for the columns, now for the rows we just need a for loop and assign the value for every row a dynamic memory. Now we can use the pointer just the way we use a 2D array. In the above example we then assigned random numbers to our 2D array(pointer).Its all about DMA of 2D array.

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ES: les dejo una solución que para mi es mejor en algunos casos. En particular para se sabe una dimensión del array. Muy util para array de chars, por ejemplo si queremos un array de tamaño variable de arrays de char[20].

EN: I have left you with a solution which works the best for me, in certain cases. Especially if one knows [the size of?] one dimension of the array. Very useful for an array of chars, for instance if we need an array of varying size of arrays of char[20].

int  size = 1492;
char (*array)[20];

array = new char[size][20];
...
strcpy(array[5], "hola!");
...
delete [] array;

ES: La clave son los parentesis en la declaracion del array.

EN: The key is the parentheses in the array declaration.

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StackOverflow only uses English, please translate your question. –  M. Mimpen Jan 30 at 15:56
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