Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

String does not have ReplaceAt(), and I'm tumbling a bit on how to make a decent function that does what I need. I suppose the CPU cost is high, but the string sizes are small so it's all ok

share|improve this question
3  
Didn't you mean 'does not have' instead of 'does have'? :) –  Abbas Feb 20 '12 at 19:27
2  
possible duplicate of how to replace part of string by position? –  Joce Apr 16 '13 at 21:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 63 down vote accepted

Use a StringBuilder:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(theString);
sb[index] = newChar;
theString = sb.ToString();
share|improve this answer
1  
ah, Stringbuilder is neat –  Jason94 Feb 20 '12 at 20:04
2  
@Jason94, I'm not sure this is more efficient than using ToCharArray as in Jon's answer, you should run tests to see which one is faster. –  Thomas Levesque Feb 20 '12 at 20:18
4  
I tried with a little benchmark on 100k iterations, ToCharArray is at least 2 time faster. –  Matteo Migliore May 13 '13 at 8:55

The simplest approach would be something like:

public static string ReplaceAt(this string input, int index, char newChar)
{
    if (input == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("input");
    }
    char[] chars = input.ToCharArray();
    chars[index] = newChar;
    return new string(chars);
}

This is now an extension method so you can use:

var foo = "hello".ReplaceAt(2, 'x');
Console.WriteLine(foo); // hexlo

It would be nice to think of some way that only required a single copy of the data to be made rather than the two here, but I'm not sure of any way of doing that. It's possible that this would do it:

public static string ReplaceAt(this string input, int index, char newChar)
{
    if (input == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("input");
    }
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(input);
    builder[index] = newChar;
    return builder.ToString();
}

... I suspect it entirely depends on which version of the framework you're using.

share|improve this answer
string s = "ihj";
char[] array = s.ToCharArray();
array[1] = 'p';
s = new string(array);
share|improve this answer

I suddenly needed to do this task and found this topic. So, this is my linq-style variant:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static string ReplaceAt(this string value, int index, char newchar)
    {
        if (value.Length <= index)
            return value;
        else
            return string.Concat(value.Select((c, i) => i == index ? newchar : c));
    }
}

and then, for example:

string instr = "Replace$dollar";
string outstr = instr.ReplaceAt(7, ' ');

In the end I needed to utilize .Net Framework 2, so I use a StringBuilder class variant though.

share|improve this answer

Strings are immutable objects, so you can't replace a given character in the string. What you can do is you can create a new string with the given character replaced.

But if you are to create a new string, why not use a StringBuilder:

string s = "abc";
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(s);
sb[1] = 'x';
string newS = sb.ToString();

//newS = "axc";
share|improve this answer
public string ReplaceChar(string sourceString, char newChar, int charIndex)
    {
        try
        {
            // if the sourceString exists
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(sourceString))
            {
                // verify the lenght is in range
                if (charIndex < sourceString.Length)
                {
                    // Get the oldChar
                    char oldChar = sourceString[charIndex];

                    // Replace out the char
                    sourceString.Replace(oldChar, newChar);
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception error)
        {
            // for debugging only
            string err = error.ToString();
        }

        // return value
        return sourceString;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
sourceString.Replace(oldChar, newChar) replaces all occurences of oldChar in the string, not just the character at charIndex. –  Dag Jun 26 '13 at 9:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.