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I am currently trying to create a REST proxy that calls a WCF SOAP service, I am stuck trying to make a channel to send the message through. I know I need to use ChannelFactory, but I don't have the interface of the service. Is there a default value I can pass? Is there another way to package the message?

When I say message, I mean one from ServiceModels.Channels.Message.

I'm very new to this so any help would be appreciated.

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1  
You Web Service can't be both based on REST and use SOAP. Which one is it? –  Enrico Campidoglio Feb 20 '12 at 19:33
    
thats why its a proxy, it takes a rest call, pulls a parameter out of the rest call, packages it as a soap message, sends it to the soap service, get the response, parses it, and sends it back through the rest service –  SmashCode Feb 20 '12 at 19:42
    
I see. I misunderstood the word proxy, I thought you meant a client side proxy :) Is the interface to the SOAP service that's missing? –  Enrico Campidoglio Feb 20 '12 at 19:45
    
yes, I'm wondering if there is a default interface I can use instead –  SmashCode Feb 20 '12 at 19:48
    
Do you have the service's WSDL contract? –  Enrico Campidoglio Feb 20 '12 at 20:04
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can generate a WCF client from a WSDL service contract in one of two ways:

Either way will generate .NET classes that correspond to the types exposed by the service contract as well as a WCF client proxy class, which you can use to invoke the service operations:

try
{
    var client = new MyServiceClient();
    client.DoSomething();
    client.Close();
}
catch
{
    if (client != null)
    {
         client.Abort();
    }
}

If you prefer to use the lower level ChannelFactory API, you should use the generated IClientChannel interface instead:

try
{
    var factory = new ChannelFactory<MyServiceChannel>();
    var client = factory.CreateChannel();
    client.DoSomething();
    client.Close();
}
catch
{
    if (client != null)
    {
         client.Abort();
    }
}
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Thank you, I ended up getting access to the source from the server and just copied the interfaces I needed, but this would've solved it as well if I only had the wsdl so I'm accepting this. Thanks. –  SmashCode Feb 20 '12 at 20:56
    
@SmashCode I see. I thought you said in one of your comments that you did have the WSDL contract. Anyway, I'm glad I could help :) –  Enrico Campidoglio Feb 20 '12 at 21:02
    
I phrased that comment weirdly, Enrico. I did have the WSDL, but now I have the WSDL AND the source so I just used the source instead of the WSDL, but your answer would have worked if I only had the WSDL and NOT the source. –  SmashCode Feb 20 '12 at 21:10
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ChannelFactory.CreateChannel creates an object that implements the interface provided and IClientChannel. That interface must match the service.

You do not need the need the same DLL that the service uses. You can create your own interface to match the definition of the service. In the ServiceContract attribute set the Name and Namespace to match that of the service.

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Is there any way to auto-generate this from the wsdl? –  SmashCode Feb 20 '12 at 19:47
    
@SmashCode Yes, using the Add Service Reference dialog in Visual Studio or the svcutil command line utility. –  Enrico Campidoglio Feb 20 '12 at 20:26
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