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When you extend a class, the child inherits the properties by copy pasting those (new variables, same values), therefore consuming more memory, or... references them?

Hope I've made myself clear.

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Are you talking about cloning an object? –  Pekka 웃 Feb 20 '12 at 19:59
    
Not really, more like- extend a class, instantiate the extended one. What happens with variables now? –  jolt Feb 20 '12 at 20:06
    
the object gets initialized with all the properties, both those defined in the ancestor class and those defined in the extended one. There is no difference between them, they're all new-born, first-class citizens of the new object –  Pekka 웃 Feb 20 '12 at 20:07
    
@Tom: I believe this is what you're referring to: php.net/manual/en/features.gc.refcounting-basics.php. Using debug_zval_dump(), it does indicate an internal reference is used rather than a new zval created or copied. –  bob-the-destroyer Feb 20 '12 at 20:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm going to assume you're referring to zvals, rather than common variable referencing. In that case, yes, it does appear that the inherited property is just an internal reference up until the point you change the value in your extended object. For more info, see the manual: http://www.php.net/manual/en/features.gc.refcounting-basics.php

An example:

class test
{
    public $a = 'asdf';

}
class test2 extends test
{

}
class test3 extends test
{

}   
class test4 extends test
{

}   

$test2 = new test2;
debug_zval_dump($test2);
$test2->a = 1;
debug_zval_dump($test2);

Results:

object(test2)#1 (1) refcount(2){
  ["a"]=>
  string(4) "asdf" refcount(5)
}
object(test2)#1 (1) refcount(2){
  ["a"]=>
  long(1) refcount(1)
}
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Very interesting. This means @Martin was right as well! I stand corrected. –  Pekka 웃 Feb 20 '12 at 20:28

When you define a class, the object and its properties doent exist yet.

When you extend a class, you just extend the definition, the blueprint of a possible future object.

When you create the object using $var = new classname();, the class definition comes "alive" with all the properties and methods defined in the class, and all its ancestor classes. But they all are first-class citizens of the new object, no matter whether they are inherited from some other class definition, or not. (Edit: this isn't entirely correct on an internal level. See Bob the destroyer's answer.) The question of referencing vs. copying never comes up at this stage.

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If it's a static property and initialized it's created when the is class is loaded. All subclasses which extend the class also point to this same static property and no additional space is used regardless of the number of child classes that share the static property. However, they all really share the same property, so change it for one class and change it for all related classes.

With non static properties, when you instantiate a object of the class, it creates it's own set of those properties, which take up their own memory.

PHP may do some creative things with strings to keep memory down, but I don't know that level.

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