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How can the below query be adjusted to return always the member with MemberID = 'xxx' as the first row

SELECT * FROM Members

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1  
What DB platform? – JohnFx Feb 20 '12 at 20:04
    
SQL Server 2008 – SShebly Feb 20 '12 at 20:05
up vote 7 down vote accepted
select * from Members
order by case when MemberID = XXX then 0 else 1 end
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This should work and it will also allow you to order the remaining items by MemberID (Assuming xxx=12 in this example)

SELECT *
FROM Members
ORDER BY CASE WHEN MemberID=12 THEN NULL ELSE isnull(MemberID,0) END

If the memberID column can't contain nulls, you can get away with this which might perform slightly better.

SELECT *
FROM Members
ORDER BY CASE WHEN MemberID=12 THEN NULL ELSE MemberID END
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What if MemberID contains negative values? – Magnus Feb 20 '12 at 20:11
    
I'm assuming it is probably an identity column. If it contains negative values you could just replace the -1 with a null. Updated my answer to be more robust and handle negative memberID values. – JohnFx Feb 20 '12 at 20:12
SELECT
  CASE WHEN MemberID = 'xxx' AS 1 ELSE 0 END CASE AS magic,
  *
FROM Members
ORDER BY magic DESC

The syntax might vary depending on yr db, but I hope you get the idea.

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try this:

SELECT * FROM Members
ORDER BY IF(x.MemberId = XXX, -1, ABS(x.MemberId))
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SELECT * FROM `Members` WHERE `MemberID` = '[ID]' LIMIT 1 UNION SELECT * FROM `Members`

This should work. Tested on my database instance. Chosen ID is always first.

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This is not guaranteed to give the correct result. – Magnus Feb 20 '12 at 20:25

A more robust solution, if you have more than one record that has to be floated to the top, or if you have a specific order for multiple records, is to add a ResultsOrder column to your table, or even another table MemberOrder(memberid, resultorder). Fill resultorder with big numbers and ...

Select m.*
From Members m
  Left Join MemberOrder mo on m.MemberID=mo.MemberID
Order by coalesce(mo.resultorder, 0) DESC
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