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I'm just working on getting at samples for processing from the microphone. I have an audio unit set up for input and output and both have render callbacks. My question is about the callback for the microphone callback.

I want core-audio to allocate the buffer in the microphone callback for me.

 UInt32 shouldAllocateBuffer = 1;
AudioUnitSetProperty(audioUnit, kAudioUnitProperty_ShouldAllocateBuffer, kAudioUnitScope_Global, 1, &shouldAllocateBuffer, sizeof(shouldAllocateBuffer));

Doing this however always results in a NULL ioData pointer in the callback. Am I stuck allocating my own buffer?

Input

static OSStatus recordingCallback(void *inRefCon, 
                          AudioUnitRenderActionFlags *ioActionFlags, 
                          const AudioTimeStamp *inTimeStamp, 
                          UInt32 inBusNumber, 
                          UInt32 inNumberFrames, 
                          AudioBufferList *ioData) {

OSStatus status;
status = AudioUnitRender(audioUnit, 
                         ioActionFlags, 
                         inTimeStamp, 
                         inBusNumber, 
                         inNumberFrames, 
                        ioData);  // ioData is null here
}

Playback

static OSStatus playbackCallback(void *inRefCon, 
                                  AudioUnitRenderActionFlags *ioActionFlags, 
                                  const AudioTimeStamp *inTimeStamp, 
                                  UInt32 inBusNumber, 
                                  UInt32 inNumberFrames, 
                                  AudioBufferList *ioData) {    
// ioData is not NULL here but I get silence in the headphones.
    return noErr;
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

AudioUnitRender still expects the AudioBufferList parameter (ioData) to be non-NULL.

If ioData is a pointer to AudioBufferList, then the buffer that should be is ioData->mBuffers[0].mData for most cases (see docs). If you are not allocating buffers, the buffer list should probably be a local variable, since it is only valid for the callback.

So, basically use a local variable and not ioData.

Note that you still need to set up your AudioBufferList to match the topology you are describing.

Here's an example:

AudioBufferList bufferList;
bufferList.mNumberBuffers = 1;
bufferList.mBuffers[0].mData = NULL;
OSStatus status;
status = AudioUnitRender(audioUnit, 
                         ioActionFlags, 
                         inTimeStamp, 
                         inBusNumber, 
                         inNumberFrames, 
                         &bufferList); // bufferList.mBuffers[0].mData is null
// Use the input data in now valid bufferList.mBuffers[0].mData
// note the buffer is only valid for the callback.

Note that if you need more than one buffers (you probably don't, even for stereo), you can use malloc to extend the size of the mBuffers array.

share|improve this answer
    
so no matter what when youre in the recording callback to need to assign your own buffer? Also If I want to use this captured audio in the playback callback I should probably copy the local buffer data to some other self managed buffer to copy to the playbacks callbacks ioData? –  dubbeat Feb 20 '12 at 21:22
    
mData is NULL, so the AudioUnit is assigning and providing that for you. This is different from providing your own - if you provide your own buffers you will need to malloc them first and free them later. If you want to capture it for later use, you can copy it to another buffer, but that is not so efficient - you probably should just supply your own buffers in this case. –  Michael Chinen Feb 20 '12 at 21:29
    
Catch 22. If you don't provide your own buffers, and want the data, you will need to copy the data to your own buffer(s) anyway. –  hotpaw2 Feb 21 '12 at 7:09
    
@hotpaw2 one case where you won't need to copy is when you have the input and output handling in the same callback (the OP doesn't do this). You can then process the input and write directly to the output. –  Michael Chinen Feb 21 '12 at 9:23
    
Is it more efficient to use Apple's buffers? i.e. if I pass my own, maybe there is an additional step in copying. But if I use Apple's, maybe there is an additional step in internal dynamic allocation, which would be far worse. –  P i Oct 25 '12 at 13:42

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