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class Base
{
public:
    string Test() { return "hi"; }
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    int Test() { return 3; }
}

I want "hi" from Base. How is it possible to get string s = Derived().Test() to work? And no, Test has no parameters.

I tried using Base::Derived, but it seems that overloaded functions that only differ in return types are not inherited/exposed. I cannot reference Base from the client code, since Base will be template generated. The client knows the type it wants. I couldn't get Test<string>() to work through inheritance either.

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3 Answers 3

That's because you're not overloading, but hiding.

You need to cast back to the base class.

Derived d;
d.Test();  //calls Derived::Test()
static_cast<Base>(d).Test(); //calls Base::Text()

You can't overload functions based on return type:

1.3.11 signature

the information about a function that participates in overload resolution (13.3): its parameter-type-list (8.3.5) and, if the function is a class member, the cv-qualifiers (if any) on the function itself and the class in which the member function is declared. [...]

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If you're on C++11 , you can do :

class Base
{
public:
    string Test() { return "hi"; }
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    template<typename T= decltype(Test())>
    T Test() { return Base::Test(); }
};

check: http://ideone.com/blXhN

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Like this: string s = Derived().Base::Test();

Your compiler won't go on a quest through base types, but it will find the right function if you tell it where to look.

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