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I'm integrating with a PIN device with an api containing asynchronous methods. For example one of them is called GetStatus and it raises a DeviceStateChangedEvent with the state passed into it as a parameter.

I'd like to have an interface that is not asynchronous over it though, so that when I call GetStatus on my interface it will actually return the status rather than raising an event to pass that data to me.

I'm thinking I could do something like this:

public class MSRDevice
{
    StatusInfo _status;
    bool _stateChangedEventCompleted = false;
    IPAD _ipad; // <-- the device

    public MSRDevice()
    {
        //Initialize device, wire up events, etc.
    }

    public StatusInfo GetStatus()
    {
        _ipad.GetStatus() // <- raises StatusChangedEvent
        while(!_stateChangedEventCompleted);
        _stateChangedEventCompleted = false;
        return _status;
    }

    void StateChangedEvent(object sender, DeviceStateChangeEventArgs e) 
    {
         _status = e.StatusInfo;
    }
}

Is this a good way to address this or this there a better solution?

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They're async for a reason. Are you sure you can wait? –  Henk Holterman Feb 20 '12 at 21:26
    
Are the DeviceStateChangedEvent events synchronized with respect to a call to GetStatus? More clearly, is this a possible sequence of events: GetStatus, GetStatus, DeviceStateChangedEvent, DeviceStateChangedEvent –  Chris Shain Feb 20 '12 at 21:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you’re doing in your example is called “busy-waiting” (or “spinning”), which is unrecommended in most scenarios since it wastes a lot of CPU power. Preferably, you should use a signalling mechanism, such as the WaitHandle class, for synchronizing when an event of interest (in your case, StatusChangedEvent) has occurred:

public class MSRDevice
{
    StatusInfo _status;
    IPAD _ipad; // <-- the device

    private EventWaitHandle waitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false);

    public MSRDevice()
    {
        //Initialize device, wire up events, etc.
    }

    public StatusInfo GetStatus()
    {
        _ipad.GetStatus() // <- raises StatusChangedEvent asynchronously
        waitHandle.WaitOne(); // <- waits for signal
        return _status;
    }

    void StateChangedEvent(object sender, DeviceStateChangeEventArgs e) 
    {
        _status = e.StatusInfo;
        waitHandle.Set(); // <- sets signal
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I was pretty sure the while loop was not the way to go but wasn't sure what the right way was. Thanks for writing out the example! –  Brandon Moore Feb 20 '12 at 21:44

The best option: code it async.

No; that is a hot loop. It will hammer the CPU. It also isn't guaranteed to exit due to register caching (this is trivial to demonstrate on x86 in particular).

If you need it sync, you should use something like an AutoResetEvent.

share|improve this answer
    
Marc, that would be great if I wasn't trying to make an interface that worked for a synchronous device and a non-synchronous device. There is absolutely no reason we need this device to ever act asynchronously so I see it as a benefit to make the interface synchronous and simplify the code. Thanks for the AutoResetEvent tip, I will check that out. –  Brandon Moore Feb 20 '12 at 21:33
    
FYI, I actually did it the other way around with the interface to the credit card providers. PC Charge was synchronous and PPI was not, so I made an interface that appeared asynchronous to the consuming code no matter which was used. In retrospect, that was a mistake because it just made it harder to integrate and maintain for no good reason. –  Brandon Moore Feb 20 '12 at 21:36
    
@BrandonMoore then use either an AutoResetEvent or (if you are familiar with using Pulse/Wait as a signal) Monitor. –  Marc Gravell Feb 20 '12 at 21:43
    
Thanks! I realized my while loop was probably a bad idea to begin with (hence the question). But if the explanation isn't too long too put in a comment I'm curious why you say it isn't guaranteed to exit due to register caching (or if you have a link to an explanation that would be great too). –  Brandon Moore Feb 20 '12 at 21:49
    
@BrandonMoore: Each processor (or core) has its own cache. If the threads on which GetStatus and StateChangedEvent are executed run on different processors (or cores), then you run the risk that they would have different copies of the _stateChangedEventCompleted field which are never synchronized. In other words, GetStatus would always read the field as false, even after StateChangedEvent sets it to true. You can trivially fix this by declaring your variable as volatile. Recommended read: Threading in C# by Joseph Albahari. –  Douglas Feb 20 '12 at 21:55

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