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I have a base class representing an item with some common properties (name, a few flags, etc):

class AbstractItem;
class MacroDefinition : public AbstractItem;

I also have a templatized class which manages collections of these items, also taking care of common functionality like loading them from XML files on disk:

template <class ItemT>
class AbstractItemManager
{
public:
    AbstractItemManager();
    ItemT* GetAt(int index);
    vector<ItemT*> Get(...);
private:
    vector<ItemT*> mItems;
};

For any given type of AbstractItem, I can create a manager class of that appropriate type, have the base functionality handled for me, and then layer functionality specific to that type on top of that:

class MacroManager : public AbstractItemManager<MacroDefinition>
{
public:
    MacroManager():AbstractItemManager<MacroDefinition>();
};

The fact that the manager class takes the type of item as a template parameter means I can make calls like this, both within MacroManager and externally, and get items of the appropriate type without having to blindly cast pointers all over the place.

MacroManager* macroManager = new MacroManager();
Macro* macro = macroManager->GetAt(2);

Now I'm implementing another class. I want to be able to pass it a reference to an AbstractItemManager so that I can access the list of items in any given manager class. However, I need to make the compiler understand that ItemT will always be derived from AbstractItem. I'd like to be able to do something like this:

class FavoriteAbstractItemList
{
public:
    FavoriteAbstractItemList(AbstractItemManager* manager)
    :mManager(manager)
    {
        vector<AbstractItem*> items = mManager->Get(...);
        ...
    }

private:
    AbstractItemManager* mManager;
};

Consequently:

FavoriteAbstractItemList* list = new FavoriteAbstractItemList(macroManager);

Of course, this is invalid, because I'm not supplying a template argument to AbstractItemManager when I'm using it in FavoriteAbstractItemList. Because my manager subclasses (MacroManager etc.) have all different ItemT types, I'm stuck here.

I imagine that I could change my class hierarchy a bit, and this would work:

template<class ItemT>
class AbstractItemManager_Base;

class AbstractItemManager : public AbstractItemManager_Base<AbstractItem>;

class MacroManager : public AbstractItemManager;

But then the template argument ItemT would be set in stone as AbstractItem in MacroManager etc., so I'd have to explicitly cast all items within MacroManager to Macro and take care to ensure that only items of type Macro were be added to it.

This seems like it's probably a common problem, but not one that has a straightforward answer. I don't have too much hands-on experience with C++ templates, so I'd greatly appreciate being set straight on this issue. Given the tradeoffs I've presented, what's the most sensible way to accomplish what I'm looking for? Or am I approaching things the wrong way to begin with?


Thanks for all your helpful answers. I ended up going with the solution that you both proposed. It hadn't occurred to me that I could use a template type to override an already-defined base type, but the compile-time chicanery of C++ templates is something I'm slowly getting used to.

As for the vector problem, that's unfortunate, but I ended up going with one of the proposed solutions and creating a separate method in the templatized class that calls the original method and stuffs everything into a new vector<ItemT*> with a bunch of static casts. I'm sure that adds a little bit of overhead, but it's still far more elegant than my knee-jerk solution of abandoning templates entirely. The only thing I really lose is the ability to directly iterate over mItems in subclasses without a cast from AbstractItem* to Macro* (etc.), but I can certainly deal with that.

Here's the new class hierarchy, in essence:

class AbstractItemManager
{
public:
    virtual AbstractItem* GetAt(int index);
    vector<AbstractItem*> Get(...);
protected:
    vector<AbstractItem*> mItems;
};

template <class ItemT>
class TemplatizedItemManager : public AbstractItemManager
{
public:
    virtual ItemT* GetAt(int index);
    std::vector<ItemT*> GetItems(...);
};

class MacroManager : public TemplatizedItemManager<Macro>;

Thanks again!

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I'm beginning to think that this may not be an appropriate situation for templates. It just dawned on me that C++ supports covariant return types (e.g. I can override virtual AbstractItem* AbstractItemManager::GetAt(int index) with virtual Macro* MacroManager::GetAt(int index)), so I can just make AbstractItemManager implement a collection of AbstractItem*s, and use a couple of pure virtual functions overridden in each derived manager class in place of the template specialization I've been using. –  awforsythe Feb 20 '12 at 21:50
    
I can't say I've read through the entire post, but a) you might like to look at the 'abstract factory pattern', and b) bear in mind that the body of class template member functions is only checked for validity upon instantiation, so you can put pretty much anything into it without needing to worry if a given function call actually exists or not. –  Kerrek SB Feb 20 '12 at 21:51
    
Still, I don't know a damned thing about C++ templates, so if I'm inadvertently spouting some kind of nonsense, I'd love to be corrected. :D –  awforsythe Feb 20 '12 at 21:51
    
so the tl;dr is "How do I cast vector<MacroDefinition*> to vector<AbstractItem*> when MacroDefinition derives from AbstractItem? –  Mooing Duck Feb 20 '12 at 21:53
1  
Well, take your time then... this is a fairly complex topic. Think of templates not as code, but merely as code generation tools. Only the actual code that comes out of instantiating a template matters in the end. But do start with something simple and build it up from there... –  Kerrek SB Feb 20 '12 at 21:53
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
class AbstractItemManager_Base
{
   public:
     virtual AbstractItem* GetAt (int index) = 0;
};

template <class ItemT>
class AbstractItemManager : public AbstractItemManager_Base
{
    ItemT* GetAt (int index); // works if ItemT derives from AbstractItem
};

Now you can use an AbstractItemManager_Base in FavoriteAbstractItemList.

Replacing vector<ItemT*> Get(...) is somewhat more involved. vector<AbstractItem*> is not compatible with vector<ItemT*>, for any ItemT. You can try to create your own container hierarchy, such that myvector<AbstractItem*> is somehow compatible with myvector<ItemT*>; or provide an iterator-based interface to your ItemManager so that it is a container; or just have two separate unrelated functions, one returning vector<ItemT*> and the other returning vector<AbstractItem*>.

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You actually have two problems. The first one is aboutz GetAt. This has a simple solution: Don't template the base, template the derived:

class AbstractItem
{
  // ...
};

class MacroDefintiion:
  public AbstractItem
{
  // ...
};

class AbstractItemMananger
{
public:
  virtual AbstractItem* GetAt(int) = 0;
  // ...
};

template<typename Item> class SpecificAbstractItemManager
{
public:
  Item* GetAt(); // covariant return type
  // ...
};

class MacroManager: public SpecificAbstractItemManager
{
  // ...
};

The second one is your Get method. That one is problematic because std::vector<Derived*> and std::vector<Base*> are unrelated classes, as far as C++ is concerned, and therefore you cannot use them for covariant return types.

Probably the best solution here is to have two functions in the derived class, one returning a std::vector<AbstractItem> (inherited from and overriding the base class function) and another one returning an std::vector<Item*>.

That is, in AbstractItemManager you have

std::vector<AbstractItem*> Get() = 0;

and in SpecificAbstractItemManager<Item> you have e.g.

std::vector<AbstractItem*> Get() { return GetSpecific(); }
std::vector<Item*> GetSpecific();
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