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I'm currently in the process of writing a game engine which is about to go through a major rewrite. First off, I'm considering what library to use in conjunction with the engine. Obviously, I'm going with OpenGL here and am going to do what I can to make it forward as well as backward compatible.

The main issue, though, is that from most of my research, I've found that great libraries like SDL (except for 1.3 - which, I don't believe is stable? I may be wrong about this) only support up to OpenGL 3 and not 4.2. FreeGlut, however, does support the latest and greatest, and seems like a good way to go for the basics of an engine.

The only thing, however, is setting up something such as Keyboard I/O and sound input audio, along with other things. Thus, I'm considering to see whether or not it's possible to use glut to initialize opengl and use opengl with it, and then have SDL do window management along with keyboard I/O, sound, etc.

Of course, there's always the option of using Qt with OpenGL, but I'd like to definitely have control over my main loop if possible (is this possible with Qt and OpenGL?).

I've heard of SFML, too, but ultimately I'd like to stick with libraries written in C as I plan to write a C library to take care of most of the primitive rendering (for the sake of pure speed and memory management, procedurally).

Thus, I'm at a loss as what to do here. IS Qt a good choice for this, or is there another C-like alternative (such as FreeGlut) which allows main-loop control (like SDL) and offers the necessary customization I'm looking for?

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I don't think any of these libraries do anything with OpenGL beyond creating a context. So (somebody correct me if I'm wrong) they'd all work with OpenGL 4.2. –  Thomas Feb 20 '12 at 22:12
    
Also, why avoid C++ if you can use it? Performance-critical sections can still be written in a C-like style if you prefer. –  Thomas Feb 20 '12 at 22:13
    
Mainly because using things like Malloc and Free are to be avoided in C++, and there are things in C that I actually prefer over C++. C works great with pointers, and the same goes with C++, but there are still a few minor differences which need to be taken into account. I plan to use a lot of C-style strings and parsing, for example. Plus, it'd just be easier to test without the OO-style overhead. –  blissfreak Feb 20 '12 at 22:15
    
@Holland: You mean the "OO-style overhead" you don't have to use? –  Nicol Bolas Feb 20 '12 at 22:17
    
Yes, that's what I meant. :) –  blissfreak Feb 20 '12 at 22:21

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

The main issue, though, is that from most of my research, I've found that great libraries like SDL (except for 1.3 - which, I don't believe is stable? I may be wrong about this) only support up to OpenGL 3 and not 4.2. FreeGlut, however, does support the latest and greatest, and seems like a good way to go for the basics of an engine.

Your research is lacking.

First, FreeGLUT should never be used for anything that you would call an "engine". Whatever you mean by that, FreeGLUT is not the tool for the job. It's designed for creating demos, which is why it owns the main loop. I understand that FreeGLUT does have a way to allow you some control over the main loop, but the standard way to use FreeGLUT doesn't do that.

Second, you are correct that SDL 1.2 is not capable of creating an OpenGL 3.2+ core context. However, you don't have to be able to create a core context to use GL 3.2+; compatibility contexts work just fine at those versions. The only platform that has no compatibility context is MacOSX's 3.2 support. So I wouldn't worry about it.

You could try GLFW. It's sort of like FreeGLUT only more game-centric. It gives you control of the render loop and so forth. It provides better input handling than FreeGLUT, as well as some light image loading functions (only TGA files). It even has a threading API (though I wouldn't suggest using these functions. GLFW 2.0 will drop them since both C++11 and C11 have native thread APIs).

However, it has no systems in place for audio.

I've heard of SFML, too, but ultimately I'd like to stick with libraries written in C as I plan to write a C library to take care of most of the primitive rendering (for the sake of pure speed and memory management, procedurally).

I'm going to ignore the fallacy about C++ not having the "pure speed and memory management;" that's a common canard that I'll ignore. The important point is this: SFML, as far as your rendering code is concerned, exists solely to create and manage the window. Your rendering code doesn't even have to talk to it. You call some SFML functions, create a couple of SFML objects, and your "C library" OpenGL code won't even have to know those C++ objects are there.

However, if you absolutely cannot work in C++ at all, you can always use Allegro version 5. It has a C API, and it provides support for OpenGL core contexts, input, audio, and most of what SFML does. It also has pretty decent documentation, and is modular (though in a different way from SFML).

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Does SFML have context creation? Edit: Nevermind, it appears that it does :): sfml-dev.org/documentation/2.0/structsf_1_1ContextSettings.php –  blissfreak Feb 20 '12 at 22:46

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