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I am writing a simple chess-playing game. I won't post it all here, but I'll give you the necessary details.

I move by clicking a square with a piece on it, then the square becomes selected, and then clicking where I want to piece to move. Sometimes in chess, a move may fail to respond to check or create a check on one's own king and is therefore illegal. The best way, I've found, to decide whether a move is illegal is to make a move on an "ifBoard" (a clone of the board) and if I deem the move legal, set the real board equal to the ifBoard.

Here is a code snippet of me responding to mouse clicks (board is the real board, destination is the clicked square, selectedSquare is the square previously selected(if not null))

    public void mousePressed(MouseEvent e){
            Square selectedSquare = board.selectedSquare();
            Square destination = board.getSquare(e.getX(), e.getY());
            board.deselect();
            if(destination == null){
                repaint();
                return;
            }

            if(selectedSquare == null){
                System.out.println("SelectedSquare is null");
                if(destination.occupiedByTeam(turn)){
                    System.out.println("destination is occupied by right team and is null");
                    board.select(destination);
                }
            }
            else{
                if(!selectedSquare.occupiedByTeam(turn)){
                    System.out.println("SelectedSquare not occupied by correct team");
                    repaint();
                    return;
                }

                if(destination.occupiedByTeam(turn)){
                    System.out.println("ChosenSquare occupied by same team");
                    board.select(destination);
                    repaint();
                    return;
                }

                //move on a dummy board and check for conflicts
                Board ifBoard = (Board)board.clone();

                System.out.println(ifBoard.toString());
                System.out.println(board.toString());
                //check if you can't move due to piece movement limitations
//.place() is a coordinate of the square on the tile system (A-H and 1-8)
                if(
                !ifBoard.move((int)selectedSquare.place().getX(), (int)selectedSquare.place().getY(), (int)destination.place().getX(), (int)destination.place().getY())
                ){
                    repaint();
                    return;
                }

                //if moving results in self-check
                if(ifBoard.check(turn)){
                    //don't move
                    repaint();
                    return;
                }
                else{
                    //move
                    System.out.println("Board moved!");
                    board = new Board(ifBoard);
                    cycleTurns();
                }
            }

            repaint();
        }

The toString calls are registering differently, but I have narrowed the problem down to the ifBoard.move() call actually moving the real board.

Here is the board class, or part of it.

import java.awt.Color;
import java.lang.Cloneable;
import java.awt.geom.*;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.Graphics2D;

public class Board implements Cloneable{
    private Square[][] squares;

    private Rectangle2D squareWrap;
    private Rectangle2D boardBorder;

    private Square selectedSquare;

    public Board(){
        squares = new Square[8][8];
        for(int i = 0; i < 8; i++){
            for(int j = 0; j < 8; j++){
                squares[i][j] = new Square(new Point2D.Double(i, j));
            }
        }

        boardBorder = new Rectangle2D.Double(Constants.boardX,
                                             Constants.boardY,
                                             Constants.borderWidth * 2 + Constants.boardSide,
                                             Constants.borderHeight * 2 + Constants.boardSide);

        squareWrap = new Rectangle2D.Double(Constants.boardX + Constants.borderWidth,
                                            Constants.boardY + Constants.borderHeight,
                                            Constants.boardSide,
                                            Constants.boardSide);

        selectedSquare = null;
    }

    public Object clone() {
        Board obj = new Board();
        obj.setSquares(this.squares);
        obj.setSelectedSquare(this.selectedSquare);

        return obj;
    }...

Am I cloning incorrectly? Is there a better way? Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Am I cloning incorrectly? Is there a better way?

The clone method should always start by calling super.clone() for reasons that I won't go into in this post.

Also, you're not cloning the attributes of the object (you're doing a shallow copy instead of a deep copy). Thus a cloned Board would share the same reference to the squares structure. (Changing the cloned Board would change the original Board.)

(Many people argue that you should avoid clone and Cloneable all together though.)

If I were you, I would strongly consider making the Board class immutable and perhaps go with some copy-on-write mechanism. That would save you a lot of headache I believe.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I understand the difference between shallow and deep copies now. Also I like the idea of having Board immutable, and I'll look into how to implement a copy-on-write mechanism. –  Eric Thoma Feb 20 '12 at 22:37
    
Could you, by chance, point me to a good Java copy-on-write implementation, so I could learn how to make one? I can't seem to find any. –  Eric Thoma Feb 20 '12 at 22:53

Your Problem might be that your clone() implementation does not create a deep copy. The cloned object shares a least some state with the instance it is cloned from. By that, I mean they are referencing the same objects:

public Object clone() {
    Board obj = new Board();
    obj.setSquares(this.squares); // Square instances are the same for both boards
    return obj;
}

If you change state on the clone - e.g. on a square - you also change it on the real board.

From what you've posted, you are calling ifBoard.move(). If that method affects part of the "shared state" then it will affect both board instances.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This was also correct, but given that I had to pick an answer I picked the more detailed (and earlier) one below. –  Eric Thoma Feb 20 '12 at 22:38
    
rightly so ; ) - and good luck with your chess game! –  alex Feb 20 '12 at 22:45

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