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My users would like to be able to hit Control+S to save a form. Is there a good cross-browser way of capturing the Ctrl+S key combination and submit my form?

App is built on Drupal, so jQuery is available.

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12 Answers 12

up vote 75 down vote accepted
$(window).keypress(function(event) {
    if (!(event.which == 115 && event.ctrlKey) && !(event.which == 19)) return true;
    alert("Ctrl-S pressed");
    event.preventDefault();
    return false;
});

Key codes can differ between browsers, so you may need to check for more than just 115.

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3  
on OS X webkit browsers cmd+s returns 19, so it is also worth checking for that. i.e. if (!(event.which == 115 && event.ctrlKey) && !(event.which == 19)) return true; –  Tadas Tamosauskas Oct 22 '10 at 9:05
2  
Only works in Firefox for me. IE9 & Chrome don't register any keypress. –  pelms Jan 6 '12 at 14:54
4  
Even with $(document).keypress (instead of $(window).keypress), IE and Chrome still grab the keypress event with 'Ctrl' before the script does. –  pelms Jan 6 '12 at 15:23
1  
For some reason Chrome returns to me char code 83 (capital S) instead of 115, see answer below for a Chrome working solution with a more generic solution to the different char codes issue –  Eran Medan Apr 23 '12 at 0:57
5  
use keydown instead of keypress in chrome –  destan Sep 29 '12 at 11:09

This works for me (using jquery) to overload ctrl-s, ctrl-f and ctrl-g:

$(window).bind('keydown', function(event) {
    if (event.ctrlKey || event.metaKey) {
        switch (String.fromCharCode(event.which).toLowerCase()) {
        case 's':
            event.preventDefault();
            alert('ctrl-s');
            break;
        case 'f':
            event.preventDefault();
            alert('ctrl-f');
            break;
        case 'g':
            event.preventDefault();
            alert('ctrl-g');
            break;
        }
    }
});
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4  
This is the only answer that worked for me in all the browsers I tested, including Chrome Version 28.0.1500.71 –  T. Brian Jones Jul 22 '13 at 16:49
1  
Doable with pure JS if you use window.addEventListener( instead of $(window).bind( –  Mister Dood Oct 20 '13 at 22:44
    
This should be the right answer! –  Matthew Dec 1 '13 at 20:54
    
On FF 27.0.1 this both alerts and opens the Save page dialog, accepted answer does not. –  NateS Mar 22 at 12:36
1  
@NatesS if you remove the alert it does not open the save dialog. It is caused due to alert. Works fine for me in all browsers. Nice workaround. –  CrazyNooB Apr 8 at 9:00

You could use a shortcut library to handle the browser specific stuff.

http://www.openjs.com/scripts/events/keyboard_shortcuts/#

shortcut.add("Ctrl+S",function() {
    alert("Hi there!");
});
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6  
This has been converted to a jQuery plugin, forked and reforked, and now supports 1.6.x: github.com/ricardovaleriano/jquery.hotkeys –  Félix Saparelli Jul 26 '11 at 4:08
10  
For fellow Googlers, the updated URL for the jQuery plugin is: github.com/jeresig/jquery.hotkeys –  bgs264 Jul 9 '12 at 15:57

This one worked for me on Chrome... for some reason event.which returns a capital S (83) for me, not sure why (regardless of the caps lock state) so I used fromCharCode and toLowerCase just to be on the safe side

$(document).keydown(function(event) {

    //19 for Mac Command+S
    if (!( String.fromCharCode(event.which).toLowerCase() == 's' && event.ctrlKey) && !(event.which == 19)) return true;

    alert("Ctrl-s pressed");

    event.preventDefault();
    return false;
});

If anyone knows why I get 83 and not 115, I will be happy to hear, also if anyone tests this on other browsers I'll be happy to hear if it works or not

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Thanks! Totally worked for us on chrome 20.0.1132.47 m !! –  MissingHandle Jul 6 '12 at 18:48
    
I have this same problem with chrome. Such a pain! –  qodeninja Jan 23 '13 at 17:56
    
p.s. now that I look at it, I think that the preventDefault is redundant as return false triggers it (And stopPropagation) but not sure it matters much for the question –  Eran Medan Apr 22 '13 at 13:39

This jQuery solution works for me in Chrome and Firefox, for both ctrl-s and cmd-s.

$(document).keydown(function(e) {
    if ((e.which == '115' || e.which == '83' ) && (e.ctrlKey || e.metaKey))
    {
        e.preventDefault();
        alert("Ctrl-s pressed");
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}); 
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Yeah, this works for me. Thank you. Upvote. –  Smartik Mar 20 at 18:03

I would like Web applications to not override my default shortcut keys, honestly. Ctrl-S already does something in browsers. Having that change abruptly depending on the site I'm viewing is disruptive and frustrating, not to mention often buggy -- I've had sites hijack Ctrl-Tab because it looked the same as Ctrl-I, both ruining my work on the site and preventing me from switching tabs as usual.

If you want shortcut keys, use the accesskey attribute. Please don't break existing browser functionality.

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2  
I agree, entirely, but unfortunately I'm the peon implementing, not the decision maker. –  ceejayoz Sep 18 '08 at 21:55
17  
True, but CTRL+S is not an often-used feature. I doubt people would miss it, especially if it means you can save your file in your webapp. –  EndangeredMassa Nov 5 '08 at 18:09
10  
I normally agree with you, but the only time I ever use ctrl-s in a browser is when I forget I'm using a webapp and expect the shortcut to do something useful. I'm normally disappointed. Gmail saves your email when you hit ctrl-s, although you'd never notice because when it just does what you expect it to, and what every desktop app does, you don't really notice. You DO notice when it thinks you want to save gmail as HTML, and it's annoying. –  Carson Myers Jan 15 '12 at 2:54
2  
This really depends on the application. I'm building a terminal emulator web app and overriding ctrl+c seems practical if not necessary. –  brack Jul 31 '12 at 13:52

I combined a few options to support FireFox, IE and Chrome. I've also updated it to better support mac

// simply disables save event for chrome
$(window).keypress(function (event) {
    if (!(event.which == 115 && (navigator.platform.match("Mac") ? event.metaKey : event.ctrlKey)) && !(event.which == 19)) return true;
    event.preventDefault();
    return false;
});

// used to process the cmd+s and ctrl+s events
$(document).keydown(function (event) {
     if (event.which == 83 && (navigator.platform.match("Mac") ? event.metaKey : event.ctrlKey)) {
        event.preventDefault();
        save(event);
        return false;
     }
});
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@Eevee: As the browser becomes the home for richer and richer functionality and starts to replace desktop apps, it's just not going to be an option to forgo the use of keyboard shortcuts. Gmail's rich and intuitive set of keyboard commands was instrumental in my willingness to abandon Outlook. The keyboard shortcuts in Todoist, Google Reader, and Google Calendar all make my life much, much easier on a daily basis.

Developers should definitely be careful not to override keystrokes that already have a meaning in the browser. For example, the WMD textbox I'm typing into inexplicably interprets Ctrl-Del as "Blockquote" rather than "delete word forward". I'm curious if there's a standard list somewhere of "browser-safe" shortcuts that site developers can use and that browsers will commit to staying away from in future versions.

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1  
The answer is No, there is no safe list of browser-safe shortcuts. And it's good for two resaons: 1. Shortcut are customizable (at least in Opera). 2. Doing so, you don't restrict browser vendor creativity to give you more power for the browser usage itself. –  gizmo Nov 5 '08 at 18:10

Problem with the shortcut method is that it may interfere with the functioning of screen readers.

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1  
That's up to the screenreader. If keyboard shortcuts are vital to a screenreader's operation, it shouldn't allow them to be overridden. –  ceejayoz Feb 18 '09 at 19:55

I like this little plugin here .. needs a bit more cross browser friendliness though:

http://code.google.com/p/js-hotkeys/

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example:

shortcut.add("Ctrl+c",function() { alert('Ok...');},{ 'type':'keydown', 'propagate':false, 'target':document });

usage

link for download: http://www.openjs.com/scripts/events/keyboard_shortcuts/#

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This should work (adapted from http://stackoverflow.com/a/8285722/388902).

var ctrl_down = false;
var ctrl_key = 17;
var s_key = 83;

$(document).keydown(function(e) {
    if (e.keyCode == ctrl_key) ctrl_down = true;
}).keyup(function(e) {
    if (e.keyCode == ctrl_key) ctrl_down = false;
});

$(document).keydown(function(e) {
    if (ctrl_down && (e.keyCode == s_key)) {
        alert('Ctrl-s pressed');
        // Your code
        return false;
    }
}); 
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