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I am experiencing problems when running some code that I am developing.

It should work as such:

For all images within directory (x)

    Read image
    Convert to greyscale
    Save to new directory (y)

    For all images within new directory (y)
        Read image
        Convert to binary
        Save to new directory (z)
    End for

End for

I have 300 images at present and so far all images are successfully converted to greyscale and saved to a new directory. However, the binary conversion is where the problems occur as it appears to not detect any images in the new directory and only appears to work if [image] files already exist within the directory before the code is executed.

Therefore, the following is what actually happens:

All files in directory (x) are read
All files in directory (x) are converted to greyscale and saved to new directory (y)
All files in directory (y) are read
It appears that directory (y) is empty (but, in fact, contains 300 greyscale images)
Program ends

However, when I run the program a second time, either with the 300 greyscale images or even a single images, the images in directory (y) are successfully converted into binary; it appears to only work if there are pre-existing images in the directory and not whilst the newly-converted-to-greyscale images are being created on-the-fly.

The method is called as follows:

public static void processFiles(){
    processGreyscale();
    System.out.println("Greyscale image conversion complete.\n");
    processBinary();
    System.out.println("Binary image conversion complete.\n");
}

I have even tried adding a time-delay between method calls to allow for the system to update itself in order to detect the newly-created [greyscale] images (in directory (y)), but this does not make any difference and the images are only recognised and converted to binary when two conditions are satisfied:

  1. There are images present in directory (y)
  2. The code is run for a second time or if there are any [image] files within the directory before the code is first executed.

Is there a way to do this so that the newly-generated greyscale images are detectable as soon as they have been created and then converted to binary?

Many thanks.

UPDATE: My code for converting to greyscale is as follows:

    try{
        //Read in original image. 
        BufferedImage inputImg = ImageIO.read(image);

        //Obtain width and height of image.
        double image_width = inputImg.getWidth();
        double image_height = inputImg.getHeight();

        //New images to draw to.
        BufferedImage bimg = null;
        BufferedImage img = inputImg;

        //Draw the new image.      
        bimg = new BufferedImage((int)image_width, (int)image_height, BufferedImage.TYPE_BYTE_GRAY);
        Graphics2D gg = bimg.createGraphics();
        gg.drawImage(img, 0, 0, img.getWidth(null), img.getHeight(null), null);

        //Save new binary (output) image.   
        String fileName = "greyscale_" + image.getName();
        File file = new File("test_images\\Greyscale\\" + fileName);
        ImageIO.write(bimg, "jpg", file);
    }
    catch (Exception e){
                  System.out.println(e);
    }

How would I modify this to add the flush() and/or close() functions?

UPDATE: I have also created a line which prints after each successful conversion and the only feedback I have from the binary method is: java.lang.NullPointerException (BINARY) test_images\Greyscale\desktop.ini: processed successfully. Binary image conversion complete. whereas it should say: (BINARY) images\298.jpg: processed successfully..

Is there any reason for this? I don't understand why the desktop.ini file is read/processed?

share|improve this question
    
... If a file is written and closed it is immediately accessible from Java. So it's likely there's something wrong with the code. Which we cannot see. –  Dave Newton Feb 20 '12 at 23:20
1  
How are you detecting files? Are you sure that you are closing the new files properly when you create them? –  DNA Feb 20 '12 at 23:21
    
I have now added the relevant code to my original post. –  SnookerFan Feb 20 '12 at 23:52
2  
How do you determine that directory(y) is empty? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 21 '12 at 1:07
    
Because I have the directory open in an explorer window and can see that the newly-generated greyscale images have been created within directory (y); however, the binary method does not 'see' the newly-created images and acts as if it is empty. –  SnookerFan Feb 21 '12 at 9:51
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have discovered what the problem was and have now resolved the issue.

Thanks to those of you who provided useful suggestions.

share|improve this answer
    
Please provide your solution here and accept your own answer. –  Fabian Barney Feb 21 '12 at 19:24
    
This was my intention, hence why I posted this comment... However, I cannot accept my own answer until the next day. –  SnookerFan Feb 21 '12 at 20:36
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Are you using any kind of buffer for writing out the new files? Make sure to flush and close it before you start the conversion to binary.

EDIT: Why do you create a BufferedImage inputImg then assign it straight away to another BufferedImage variable img? I don't see any reason for doing that.

After ImageIO.write() try adding in bimg.flush().

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I am - please see my original post once again as I have added the relevant code to it. Thank you. –  SnookerFan Feb 20 '12 at 23:53
    
Thank you; I have tried this, but this has not resolved the issue. I have created a line which prints after each successful conversion and the only feedback I have from the binary method is: java.lang.NullPointerException (BINARY) test_images\Greyscale\desktop.ini: processed successfully. Binary image conversion complete. whereas it should say: (BINARY) images\298.jpg: processed successfully.. Any ideas? –  SnookerFan Feb 21 '12 at 9:54
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You may want to use Apache IO's FileAlterationObserver and FileAlterationMonitor. There you can add your own FileAlterationListener which is doing the conversion jobs on adequate events (e.g. onFileCreate(File) and onFileChange(File)).

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