Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

The code in question

public void StartPlaying()
{
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(ignoredState =>
    {
        while (_playlist.Count > 0)
        {
            var audioFile = _playlist.Dequeue();

            if (StartedPlaying != null)
                StartedPlaying(this, new TypedAudioFileEventArgs(audioFile));

            audioFile.SoundPlayer.PlaySync();
            audioFile.SoundPlayer.Dispose();

            if (StoppedPlaying != null)
                StoppedPlaying(this, new TypedAudioFileEventArgs(audioFile));
        }
    });
}

and my test:

[TestMethod()]
public void StartPlayIsCalledTwice_OnlyRunningOnce()
{
    int timeBetweenPlays = 0; 
    var target = new TypedAudioFilePlayer(timeBetweenPlays);

    target.AddFile(TypedAudioFileCreator.CreateWord(1, "bl"));
    target.StartedPlaying += StartedPlaying_Once;

    target.StartPlaying();
    target.StartPlaying();
}

private bool _once = false;
private void StartedPlaying_Once(object sender, TypedAudioFileEventArgs e)
{
    if (!_once)
        _once = true;
    else
        Assert.Fail("Should not be called more than once!");
}

I believe my unit test should fail, judging by the MSDN description of ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem:

Queues a method for execution. The method executes when a thread pool thread becomes available.

The default ThreadPool size is 512, so two threads should immediately be available to process the StartPlaying call. I believe my code should fail since I haven't provided any safeguards from race conditions in which both threads can access the same resource.

What's happening here?

share|improve this question
    
try declaring _once as volatile... – Mitch Wheat Feb 21 '12 at 0:03
    
@Mitch: Tried it, test still passes. I like how what should technically be a good thing (test passing) is turning out to be a source of fear and confusion (WHY are you passing!?). Heh, software methodologies are fun. – IAE Feb 21 '12 at 0:05
    
Even if there weren't race conditions in this code, the Assert will be raised on a different thread to the one executing the test. – Porges Feb 21 '12 at 0:24
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because the StartedPlaying event is only raised if StartPlaying is called when there are items to play.

_playlist.Dequeue(); dequeues the file you enqueue. Therefore the second time you get to while (_playlist.Count > 0) it will immediately fail, passing the second call to StartPlaying straight through without raising the event.

Also, as Bruno Silva points out, the thread spawned by the second call to StartPlaying may not have a chance to execute anything before the test exits.

For what it's worth, there are about a million at least 2 threading mistakes in this code also:

// Where did _playlist come from?  Is it shared state among the player threads?
// If so, all access to it should be in locks, since queues are not thread safe
while (_playlist.Count > 0) 


// Both of these start threads and then immediately return.  
// The test will probably exit before either of those threads do anything much
    target.StartPlaying();
    target.StartPlaying();
}

If you want to properly unit test, you need to define preconditions, expectations, actions, and postconditions:

  • Preconditions: you have an initialized TypedAudioFilePlayer with one file queued:

    var target = new TypedAudioFilePlayer(timeBetweenPlays); target.AddFile(TypedAudioFileCreator.CreateWord(1, "bl"));

  • Expectations: The StartedPlaying event will be raised only once if StartPlaying is called twice

    target.StartedPlaying += StartedPlaying_Once;

  • Actions: The StartPlaying method will be called twice:

    target.StartPlaying(); target.StartPlaying();

  • Postconditions: The StartedPlaying event was only raised once:

    private bool _once = false;

    private void StartedPlaying_Once(object sender, TypedAudioFileEventArgs e) { if (!_once) _once = true; else Assert.Fail("Should not be called more than once!"); }

Now, your test succeeds. That's not good in this case, because of what I explain above. You need to get your test to a failing state by eliminating the queue bug and race condition, then work on making the test pass the right way.

share|improve this answer
    
A million? I thought i'm just missing a lock that I haven't written yet for the sake of writing a failing unit test first. That's what my question is about, getting the test in a consistently failing state before I add the lock. – IAE Feb 21 '12 at 0:13
    
The test cannot reliably pass (or fail, in this case) while there are race conditions. – Chris Shain Feb 21 '12 at 0:15
    
Excellent point, I think my approach to unit testing a threaded function was clearly misguided. +1 – IAE Feb 21 '12 at 0:20
    
Not at all- you are just going about it in a way that can only lead to tears. I'll try to clarify the "best practices" approach in my answer – Chris Shain Feb 21 '12 at 0:24
    
Great explanation, thanks! I would upvote again if I could :D – IAE Feb 21 '12 at 0:48

It seems that you are working with a shared resource between two threads so once might not be set to true when the Play is called for the second time. You can use a lock to allow executing part of your code by one thread at a time :

private readonly object lock_object=new object();
private void StartedPlaying_Once(object sender, TypedAudioFileEventArgs e)
{
lock(lock_object)
{    
if (!_once)
        _once = true;
    else
        Assert.Fail("Should not be called more than once!");
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have tried this as well, only I put my lock in the StartPlaying function before the call to QueueUserWork (another boolean checking if Sound is already being played in another thread). Still passes though :D – IAE Feb 21 '12 at 0:10
    
you are failing your test based on _once value so you should put your lock here (shared resource :) ) – Beatles1692 Feb 21 '12 at 0:16
    
Thank you for the tip, hopefully if I keep fiddling around with that I'll eventually get it into a consistently failing state ^^ – IAE Feb 21 '12 at 0:19

Could those be failing outside the text execution? Your test ends right after you queue the item so I'm not sure what is happening to those threads when the test method ends its execution. Have you tried using WaitHandle to wait for the them to finish inside the test?

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.waithandle.aspx for an example.

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean after I queue the item? I call audioPlayer.StartPlaying() twice to see if it will fire the event twice. I don't stop after adding the file. – IAE Feb 21 '12 at 0:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.