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How do I use a file called dados.txt as input data for multiplication of two arrays? That is, I do not want to use cin, but read the data file dados.txt

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#define MAX 100
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int A[MAX][MAX], B[MAX][MAX], C[MAX][MAX];
    int m, n, p, i, j, k, aux;
    ifstream arquivo;
    arquivo.open("dados.txt");
    while (arquivo >> aux)
    {
        //cin >> m >> n >> p;
    //read dados.txt
        for (i = 0; i < m; i++)
            for (j = 0; j < n; j++)
                cin >> A[i][j];
        for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
            for (j = 0; j < p; j++)
                cin >> B[i][j];
        for (i = 0; i < m; i++)
            for (j = 0; j < p; j++)
            {
                C[i][j] = 0;
                for (k = 0; k < n; k++)
                    C[i][j] += A[i][k] * B[k][j];
            }
        for (i = 0; i < m; i++)
        {
            for (j = 0; j < p; j++)
                cout << C[i][j] << " ";
            cout << endl;
        }
    }
    arquivo.close();
    return 0;
}

dados.txt The file contains the following data (example):

3 5 4
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're already reading from the file through the filestream that you declared, arquivo. Instead of doing cin >> A[i][j], you just do arquivo >> A[i][j]. But you also need to take out arquivo >> aux from the while condition. The way you have it setup, it seems you know exactly how long the loop will be. You don't really even need the while loop. That part of the code can just be:

arquivo.open("dados.txt");
for (i = 0; i < m; i++)
    for (j = 0; j < n; j++)
        arquivo >> A[i][j];
for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
    for (j = 0; j < p; j++)
        arquivo >> B[i][j];
for (i = 0; i < m; i++)
    for (j = 0; j < p; j++)
    {
        C[i][j] = 0;
        for (k = 0; k < n; k++)
            C[i][j] += A[i][k] * B[k][j];
    }
for (i = 0; i < m; i++)
{
    for (j = 0; j < p; j++)
        cout << C[i][j] << " ";
    cout << endl;
}
arquivo.close();
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Samiur. –  Regis da Silva Feb 21 '12 at 15:04

You're looking for this reference:

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/iostream/fstream/

The fstream object will let you open a file, and read its contents in various ways.

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Replace cin in the code with arquivo and you are done (provided that logic is OK).

Like,

arquivo >> m >> n >> p;

Giving this object more conventional name (like fin or filein) would not harm.

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Your ifstream arquivo is actually of a similar class as std::cin, so you can use it exactly the same way: `arquivo >> m >> n >> p;".

I don't understand the aux variable though, what do you want to do with it?

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Chris' link is the right one to look onto. You can do something like this: (checkout the example on the cplusplus.com site)

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main () {
   string line;
   ifstream myfile ("example.txt");
   if (myfile.is_open())
   {
       while ( myfile.good() )
       {
        getline (myfile,line);
        cout << line << endl;
       //maybe a function-call with the string line to extract the values you need
       }
       myfile.close();
   }

   else cout << "Unable to open file"; 

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

You can read numbers from a text file like this.

Open a file stream

ifstream DataFile;  
DataFile.open (fileLocation.c_str(), ios::in); //assume fileLocation is a string type

Read and store a line of input

string input;    
getline(DataFile, input);

And then you can extract the number from that string using various methods (such as those that manipulates string, convert cstring to int/float). It depends on how much you know about how the text file will look like.

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