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I know that declaring a function (normal function not a method inside a class) as inline is a good practice when the function definition is small for performance and it save time for the compilation. But how about inline methods inside a class I don't understand the concept of inline methods inside a class? How to define them and how they work.

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1  
"is a good practice when the funtion definition is small for performance and it save time for the compilation" - where did you read that? –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 21 '12 at 0:33
    
@OliCharlesworth : I mean if the function contains one or two statements then declaring this function as inline will save time of jumps that the compile do to the definition and specially if this funtion was called a lot of times. –  AlexDan Feb 21 '12 at 0:39
    
Keep in mind that since the compiler is generating code for inlined functions at each call site, you probably aren't helping your compile time. Excessive inlining will degrade compile time and increase your executable size. –  brendanw Feb 21 '12 at 2:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

but how about inline methods inside a class ?

Both syntaxes for inlining functions (using explicit inline and defining member-function inside class definition) provides only hint about inlining for compiler. From performance point of view, they are equal.

In case of defining a member-function inside a class declaration, the readability of the latter should be of your main concern: it really hurts to litter class interface with multiple line of implementation details. So avoid doing that if your member-function is more than one statement: return stuff or simple forwarding should be OK, but usually no more than that.

class MyClass
{
public:
    void f() const { return m_i; }
    void g() const;

private:
    int m_i;
};

inline MyClass::g() const
{
    return m_i;
}

// both member-functions behave equally (except for naming)
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is the declaration and the definition of g() must be in the same file as the main() funtion. or it's possible to write just the declaration of the the funtion g() and the definition in another file. –  AlexDan Feb 21 '12 at 1:18
    
The definition can be put in separate file, but it need to be in the same translation unit as the code that makes a call to g(). Which effectively means that the definition shall be included into source file containing that makes a call. –  Alexander Poluektov Feb 21 '12 at 1:59

Specifying a function/procedure as inline inside a class is hinting to the compiler that instead of creating code to call the function and pass parameters, the contents of the function should be placed at the point of call.

It can improve performance of the compiled binary when it becomes more efficient to execute the function without having to pass parameters. It can also be a detriment to performance because repeating the code that would have been in the function at every call location can cause bloat which lessens the liklihood that your code will be found in faster cache memory.

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There are two options to offer to the compiler to make a class-function inline:

(1) If define a function in the declaration of the Class (In a Header-File)

class Human {

public:

    Human(const char* name);
    Human();

    //is implicit inline
    void lookAt(const char* name) const {
        std::cout << "I'm looking at " << name << std::endl;

    }

private:
    char _name[30]; 

}; 

(2) use the inline keyword explicit in the definition of the function (In a Header-File)

    //is explicit inline 
    inline void lookAt(const char* name) const {
        std::cout << "I'm looking at " << name << std::endl;

    }
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2  
You can't put the the inline method in the .cpp file. It still has to go in a header. –  KayEss Feb 21 '12 at 1:08
1  
Yes, you are right. If I put the inline method definition in a .cpp file I'll get an "unresolved external" error from the linker. So whether explicit or implicit, the inline functions has to be in the header. –  Jan Koester Feb 21 '12 at 1:18

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