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I'm trying to understand generics properly, and I've written a very simple factory, but I can' see how to get round these two warnings (I've had a good grovel around, but probably I'm not searching with the right terms). Oh! and I don't want to just supress warnings - I'm pretty sure it should be possible to do this properly.

  • Type safety: The constructor simpleFactory(Class) belongs to the raw type simpleFactory. References to generic type simpleFactory should be parameterized
  • simpleFactory is a raw type. References to generic type simpleFactory should be parameterized

All the constructs I've tried to resolve this actually fail to compile - this seems to be the closest I can get. It's the line marked ++++ that generates the warnings (on Eclipse Indigo for an android project)

I realise there are some excellent object factories around, but this is about understanding the language rather than actually making a factory ;)

Here is the source:

import java.util.Stack;

public class simpleFactory<T> {

private Stack<T> cupboard;
private int allocCount;
private Class<T> thisclass;

public static simpleFactory<?> makeFactory(Class<?> facType) {
    try {
        facType.getConstructor();
    } catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
        return null;
    }
+++++   return new simpleFactory(facType);
}

private simpleFactory(Class<T> facType) {
    thisclass = facType;
    cupboard = new Stack<T>();
}

public T obtain() {
    if (cupboard.isEmpty()) {
        allocCount++;
        try {
            return thisclass.newInstance();
        } catch (IllegalAccessException a) {
            return null;
        } catch (InstantiationException b) {
            return null;
        }
    } else {
        return cupboard.pop();
    }
}

public void recycle(T wornout) {
    cupboard.push(wornout);
}   
}
share|improve this question

So the important part is you actually want to capture the type of the class being passed to the factory method. I am using the same identifier (T) which hides the type of the class, which could be a little confusing so you might like to use a different identifier.

You also need to instantiate the class with a specific type, like cutchin mentioned.

public static <T> simpleFactory<T> makeFactory(Class<T> facType)
{
    try
    {
        facType.getConstructor();
    }
    catch (NoSuchMethodException e)
    {
        return null;
    }
    return new simpleFactory<T>(facType);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Upvoted for not posting broken code the first time around! – cutchin Feb 21 '12 at 1:23
    
OOh! looking goood.... – pootle Feb 21 '12 at 1:30
    
This is the answer - and static <T> classname<T> was not the syntax I would have thought of in a long time. – pootle Feb 21 '12 at 1:35

My previous answer was altogether broken. This is the better factory method.

public static <R> simpleFactory<R> makeFactory(Class<R> facType) {
    try {
        facType.getConstructor();
    } catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
        return null;
    }
   return new simpleFactory<R>(facType);
}

Usage:

simpleFactory<String> factory = simpleFactory.makeFactory(String.class);
share|improve this answer
    
Surely this is chicken and egg though cutchin. If the makeFactory method isn't static, I loose the benefit of either returning a working factory or null. I may as well make the constructor public, but this means it may fail when obtain is first called, whereas with the static makefactory method I can check for the major reason for later failure when the factory is setup, so the factory clients' are much less likely to fail to get an object back from obtain. – pootle Feb 21 '12 at 1:02
    
Oh, sorry, leave it static. I just pasted the code into another class I was working on and it couldn't be static in that scope. It's the <T> part that matters. – cutchin Feb 21 '12 at 1:06
    
Ah! been there though, if I replace ? with T in the static method I get - Cannot make a static reference to the non-static type T – pootle Feb 21 '12 at 1:16
    
No, what I wrote before simply didn't work. Try what's above. – cutchin Feb 21 '12 at 1:18
    
Usage bit good too - was thinking I needed to cast the result from makefactory, but this is really nice and clean now. – pootle Feb 21 '12 at 1:40

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