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Given a random class:

public class A<T> {
    public T t;

    public A () {}  // <-- why is this constructor necessary for B?
    public A (T t) {
        this.setT(t);
    }
    public T getT () {
        return this.t;
    }
    protected void setT (T t) {
        this.t = t;
        return;
    }
}

And an extended class:

public class B extends A<Integer> {
    public B (Integer i) {
        this.setT(i);
    }
}

Why does B require A to have the empty constructor? I would have assumed it would want to use the similar constructor instead of the default constructor. I tried compiling without the default constructor, but I get the following message without it...

java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: A: method <init>()V not found at B.<init>

Can anyone explain why this is?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The important point is to understand that the first line of any constructor is to call the super constructor. The compiler makes your code shorter by inserting super() under the covers, if you do not invoke a super constructor yourself.

Also if you do not have any constructors an empty default constructor - here A() or B() - would automatically be inserted.

You have a situation where you do not have a super(...) in your B-constructor, so the compiler inserts the super() call itself, but you do have an A-constructor with arguments so the the default A()-constructor is not inserted, and you have to provide the A()-constructor manually, or invoke the A(i)-constructor instead. In this case, I would suggest just having

public class B extends A<Integer> {
    public B (Integer i) {
        super(i);
    }
}
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Would it be correct to say, when a object is instantiated, all the objects it inherits from are also instantiated (like building blocks)? –  Zak Feb 21 '12 at 1:20
    
I would rather say that when you instantiate an object the constructor is responsible for initializing the object. If you subclass that, the subclassed constructor is responsible for initializing the added part, and the super constructor is responsible for the rest. This applies recursively all the way up to the Object class itself. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 21 '12 at 1:27

You may use your own constructor in A, but you have to call it explicitly from the B's constructor, e.g.:

public B(Integer i) {
  super(i);
  ...
}

If you don't do that, the compiler will attempt to instantiate A itself, by calling its default constructor.

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If you don't make a call to a super constructor using super(i) as the first line of your constructor it will implicitly call the default super constructor

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