Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's the situation. Let's say we have two separate object types, and we want each of them to point to the other. For example:

public class Object1
{
    Object2 obj2;

    public Object1(Object2 obj)
    {
        obj2 = obj;
    }
}

public class Object2
{
    Object1 obj1;

    public Object2()
    {
        obj1 = null;
    }

    public void setObject1(Object1 obj)
    {
        this.obj1 = obj;
    }
}

public class Tester
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Object2 obj2 = new Object2();
        Object1 obj1 = new Object1(obj2);
        obj2.setObject1(obj1);
    }
}

Is this allowed in Java? Are there any problems with doing something like this?

share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried it? It should work just fine. –  James Montagne Feb 21 '12 at 1:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes, it is allowed in Java. The compiler tracks dependencies in a manner slightly different than C / C++ compilers, so when it detects that you compiled Object1 which needs to use a non-compiled version of Object2, it will also compile Object2.

As far as the meaning of "contains" in this context, to be technically correct, neither object contains the other, they both contain references to the other. That said, there is no limitation on objects containing references (no matter how circular).

Of interesting note, the garbage collector also deals with circular references nicely, so if a disconnected circle of referencing objects is created, they will get garbage collected at roughly the same time. Older techniques of garbage collection that work through reference counting could be fooled by circular references, but Java uses a reachability algorithm which determines if the objects are reachable from the main program thread(s).

share|improve this answer
    
That is interesting Edwin. I did some further research and discovered that whereas the objects will become "unreachable" from a "live thread" they may not be collected for "an indefinite amount of time". See more here: java.sun.com/docs/books/performance/1st_edition/html/… –  Travis J Feb 21 '12 at 1:53
    
That doc is 10+ years old though, so hopefully Edwin is correct and it has been fixed in newer versions –  dann.dev Feb 21 '12 at 2:01
1  
The amount of time before collection is still indefinite, but it is guaranteed to happen before you get an out-of-memory error. So it's never a problem - the JVM will reclaim the space if it needs to. –  mikera Feb 21 '12 at 2:13
1  
@TravisJ The indefinite amount of time is not a mistake, it is to allow flexibility in garbage collection implementations. If they specified an exact amount of time, a busy Java program might be paused unnecessarily to do garbage collection. By specifying an indefinite amount of time, a well crafted JVM has the option of scheduling its garbage collection at times when it should impact the running program less. Since I started working with JVMs, at least four different JVM garbage collection schemes come to mind. The latest is the "Garbage-first" collector (aka G1). –  Edwin Buck Feb 21 '12 at 2:23

There are no problems. Cycles are allowed. You should have just compiled and checked rather than asking a question ;-).

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, thanks! –  Mason Feb 21 '12 at 1:43

Yes, circular dependencies are allowed in Java, and that's the correct way to handle them.

share|improve this answer

As James and Pangea said, you can learn a lot just by trying things out for yourself. For example, what do you think happens in this interesting situation?

class Class1 {
    public static final String name = Class2.name;
}

class Class2 {
    public static final String name = Class1.name;
}

class CircularTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(Class1.name);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.