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What is the idiomatic Ruby analog of a pattern that represents a potentially deferred asynchronous computation with the possibility to subscribe to its completion? i.e. something along the lines of .NET System.Threading.Task, or Python 3.x concurrent.futures.future.

Note that this does not necessarily imply multithreading - the actual implementation of the "future" object would just as likely use some other way of scheduling the work and obtaining result, and is out of scope of the question. The question concerns strictly with the API that is presented to the user of the object.

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sounds like something backgroundrb might help with, check out: backgroundrb.rubyforge.org/workers does this involve a web stack (webserver? db? cache?) #hopingfor+100rep – edwardsharp Feb 29 '12 at 6:27
    
@edwardsharp No, this does not involve a web stack. Well, it can, actually, but it is more generic than that - this is about API for asynchronous operations w/callbacks in particular, regardless of how exactly that asynchrony is actually implemented. – Pavel Minaev Mar 1 '12 at 0:03
    
Great read, implements a naive future api, may help. tx.pignata.com/2012/11/… – mwoods79 Nov 27 '12 at 22:39
    
I recently wrote a promises library: github.com/cameron-martin/pure_promise. It's designed to work with asynchronous i/o with a reactor library like eventmachine, but is completely agnostic in that respect; It would work just as well by linking it up to a thread pool or whatever. It might be the kind of thing you're looking for. – Cameron Martin Aug 18 '14 at 13:37

I am not sure about vanilla Ruby, but EventMachine has deferrables.

Also, check out this article.

EM.run {
  detector = LanguageDetector.new("Sgwn i os yw google yn deall Cymraeg?")
  detector.callback { |lang| puts "The language was #{lang}" }
  detector.errback { |error| puts "Error: #{error}" }
}
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If there is a lack of a standard pattern in core Ruby, I will indeed have to look at what various frameworks offer to see if a common pattern can be derived there. This is a good pointer - do you know of any other frameworks that have something similar? – Pavel Minaev Feb 21 '12 at 4:18
    
@PavelMinaev: from the top of my head - no. But I'll think about it :) – Sergio Tulentsev Feb 21 '12 at 4:28

Fast forward a month.

http://celluloid.io/

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Can you elaborate? I think a Celluloid homepage link does not explain much. – lulalala Jun 21 '13 at 2:08

Fiber?

Fibers are primitives for implementing light weight cooperative concurrency in Ruby. Basically they are a means of creating code blocks that can be paused and resumed, much like threads. The main difference is that they are never preempted and that the scheduling must be done by the programmer and not the VM. link

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This isn't about concurrency per se, more about asynchrony. Suppose that I already have a library that is not written in Ruby, but which returns futures (e.g. it's a .NET library and it returns System.Threading.Task). I need to know how to best expose that in Ruby in a way that will look most natural to Ruby developers. – Pavel Minaev Feb 21 '12 at 4:11
    
Fiber actually is not about concurrency, it's non-blocking model, i.e. asynchrony, like node.js. You can check the usage of this techonlogy in ruby framework postrank-labs.github.com/goliath – megas Feb 21 '12 at 5:26
    
I understand that. Still, so far as I can see, fibers are an all or nothing thing - i.e. if you don't control the implementation of some of the APIs involved, and they don't use fibers, you can't really use them yourself because you simply won't have a fiber to yield to. I need something higher-level that abstracts over implementation specifics of asynchrony in any given case, and presents a universal common interface for any type of async operation. – Pavel Minaev Feb 22 '12 at 18:28

You can use a job queue like resque
Have coded some quick examples for pure ruby

  1. by forking a child process

    rd, wr = IO.pipe
    
    p1 = fork do
      rd.close
      # sleep is for demonstration purpose only
      sleep 10
      # the forked child process also has a copy of the open file
      # handles, so we close the handles in both the parent and child
      # process
      wr.write "1"
      wr.close
    end
    
    wr.close
    
    puts "Process detaching | #{Time.now}"
    Process.detach(p1)
    puts "Woot! did not block | #{Time.now}"
    
    1.upto(10) do
      begin
        result = rd.read_nonblock(1)
      rescue EOFError
        break
      rescue Exception
        # noop
      end
    
      puts "result: #{result.inspect}"
      system("ps -ho pid,state -p #{p1}")
      sleep 2
    end
    
    rd.close
    
    __END__
    
    ruby 1.9.2p180 (2011-02-18 revision 30909) [x86_64-darwin10.6.0]
    Process detaching | 2012-02-28 17:05:49 +0530
    Woot! did not block | 2012-02-28 17:05:49 +0530
    result: nil
      PID STAT
     5231 S+  
    result: nil
      PID STAT
     5231 S+  
    result: nil
      PID STAT
     5231 S+  
    result: nil
      PID STAT
     5231 S+  
    result: nil
      PID STAT
     5231 S+  
    result: "1"
      PID STAT
    
  2. by having a callback on a thread

    require 'thread'
    
    Thread.abort_on_exception = true
    
    module Deferrable
      def defer(&block)
        # returns a thread
        Thread.new do
          # sleep is for demonstration purpose only
          sleep 10
    
          val = block.call
          # this is one way to do it. but it pollutes the thread local hash
          # and you will have to poll the thread local value
          # can get this value by asking the thread instance
          Thread.current[:human_year] = val
          # notice that the block itself updates its state after completion
        end
      end
    end
    
    class Dog
      include Deferrable
      attr_accessor :age, :human_age
      attr_accessor :runner
    
      def initialize(age=nil)
        @age = age
      end
    
      def calculate_human_age_as_deferred!
        self.runner = defer do
          # can do stuff with the values here
          human_age = dog_age_to_human_age
          # and finally publish the final value
          after_defer { self.human_age = human_age }
          # return value of the block. used in setting the thread local
          human_age
        end
      end
    
      protected
      def dog_age_to_human_age
        (self.age / 7.0).round(2)
      end
    
      def after_defer(&block)
        block.call
      end
    end
    
    dog = Dog.new(8)
    dog.calculate_human_age_as_deferred!
    
    1.upto(10) do
      sleep 2
      puts "status: #{dog.runner.status} | human_age: #{dog.human_age.inspect}"
      break unless dog.runner.status
    end
    
    puts "== using thread local"
    
    dog = Dog.new(8)
    dog.calculate_human_age_as_deferred!
    
    1.upto(10) do
      sleep 2
      puts "status: #{dog.runner.status} | human_age: #{dog.runner[:human_year].inspect}"
      break unless dog.runner.status
    end
    
    __END__
    
    ruby 1.9.2p180 (2011-02-18 revision 30909) [x86_64-darwin10.6.0]
    status: sleep | human_age: nil
    status: sleep | human_age: nil
    status: sleep | human_age: nil
    status: sleep | human_age: nil
    status: false | human_age: 1.14
    == using thread local
    status: sleep | human_age: nil
    status: sleep | human_age: nil
    status: sleep | human_age: nil
    status: sleep | human_age: nil
    status: false | human_age: 1.14
    

threads consume less memory than forking a child process but forking is robust. An unhandled error in a thread can bring down the whole system. while an unhandled error in a child process, will only bring down the child process

Other people have pointed out fibres and eventmachine (using EM::Deferrable and EM.defer) are another option

Fibres and threads need careful coding. code can be wrong in subtle ways.
Also fibres use pre-emptive multitasking so the codebase has to be well behaved

Eventmachine is fast but it is an exclusive world (like twisted in python). It has its own separate IO stack, so all the libraries have to be written to support eventmachine. Having said that, i do not think library support is a problem for eventmachine

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I am not implementing asynchrony, I am exposing something that is already implemented to Ruby. "The question concerns strictly with the API that is presented to the user of the object." – Pavel Minaev Feb 28 '12 at 17:20
    
@PavelMinaev if i get the comment correctly. you want a non-invasive solution? both the solutions are a little invasive. For the example i gave, will have to use a wrapper around the code. Can always make a gem out of it – deepak Feb 29 '12 at 12:49
    
Imagine that I have a DLL, written in C, that exposes an asynchronous function. Asynchrony is in the form of a callback - i.e. you call it, and provide your callback that is called once the operation is done. How exactly that is implemented is an implementation detail - the DLL can use threads or fibers or something else. I need to wrap and expose said function to Ruby code in some way that is idiomatic for Ruby, but I cannot touch its implementation. – Pavel Minaev Mar 1 '12 at 0:02

lazy.rb provides "futures", but they don't seem to be exactly the same as you describe (or I would expect):

Additionally, the library provides futures, where a computation is run immediately in a background thread.

So, you can't compute them later, or insert values into them (from the network perhaps) by other means.

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It's still a good pointer - even if those things have hardcoded implementation, looking at their API surface is useful. Unfortunately, they look really simplistic; specifically, there's no way to subscribe to completion of the future there, you can only block until it gives you a result. – Pavel Minaev Mar 2 '12 at 5:02
    
I'm not sure what you mean by subscribe; do you mean like this? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd270696.aspx – Samuel Edwin Ward Mar 2 '12 at 13:43
    
Yes, pretty much that. Not necessarily chainable like that, though - e.g. see Future.add_done_callback in standard module concurrent.futures in Python 3.x. – Pavel Minaev Mar 2 '12 at 17:31
    
You could simulate that by spawning a new thread to wait on the future and execute the callback after, although obviously there's a lot of unnecessary overhead there. There is also no documented way to tell if a future's value has been computed yet (although it looks like inspect could be used; I'm no rubyist), and no thread pooling or computation queueing; each future seems to be computed in its own new thread. – Samuel Edwin Ward Mar 2 '12 at 18:08
    
I wouldn't use these particular futures anyway; to remind, I already have an equivalent of a future from a different language, and how it is implemented is not under my control.My goal is to expose that equivalent of a future in a way that's idiomatic Ruby - so if Ruby (or some popular third-party library) already has futures or their equivalent, I'd try to use them (not an option here, as these things convert an existing sync function to async; I already have async), or else imitate them. – Pavel Minaev Mar 2 '12 at 18:52

Maybe I'm missing something, but if the situation is as you describe in your response to deepak, then why not wrap the C API as a Ruby extension and provide a Ruby method that accepts a block corresponding to your needed callback? That would also be very idiomatic Ruby.

Here's a sample chapter dealing with extending Ruby with C from the "Pickaxe" Book updated for Ruby 1.9: http://media.pragprog.com/titles/ruby3/ext_ruby.pdf.

Update: Here are some links dealing with Ruby exceptions in Ruby and in it's C interface.

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It is a possibility, if that's the standard way of doing things. It still invites some further questions, e.g. if result is propagated to the callback as its argument, then how should errors (exceptions) be propagated? – Pavel Minaev Mar 2 '12 at 17:34
    
You could do this the same way you would for any Ruby library by throwing an exception. This could be done in C as the Ruby C interface allows you to basically do anything you can in Ruby in C (read more verbosely), or it could be done in a Ruby wrapper. I'll update my answer with some links on Ruby exceptions in and out of the C interface. – drnewman Mar 3 '12 at 0:04
    
Since the function executes asynchronously, any error/exception it would throw would also be reported asynchronously. I.e. when you call it as foo({|result| ... }), it can't throw an exception at the point of the call, because it hasn't started executing yet. Rather, it needs to propagate that exception to the callback. Passing it as an additional parameter, i.e. foo({|result, err| ... }) is one option. Another is passing a promise instead of raw result, i.e. foo({|promise| result = promise.result ... }), and then promise.result would throw if there was an error. – Pavel Minaev Mar 3 '12 at 0:39
    
You're right, I shouldn't have mentioned throwing an exception. I do like the foo {|result, err| ... } type callback it's very jQuery-ish, which would be familiar to many Ruby programmers. Also, EventMachine has an error_handler callback that catches all errors that result from the event loop, which may work for you too. (see eventmachine.rubyforge.org/EventMachine.html#M000496) – drnewman Mar 3 '12 at 1:00

I found this to be extremely helpful:

https://github.com/wireframe/backgrounded

It is a gem that simply allows pushing methods onto a background task.

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The thread gem might be of interest. You can make a thread-pool that processes stuff in the background. The gem also support a whole lot of other features like future, delay etc. Have a look at the github repo.

It appears to work with a wide range of ruby versions, not just 1.9+, which is why I use this.

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