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We recently fixed an issue with the character encoding being read incorrectly into our system from the text files by making sure the file is UTF-8 and the Java code opens these files in UTF-8 encoding.

However, we had ended up adding a lot of records across the entire database tables with incorrect characters being inserted i.e. °F was read as �F. So even though we have fixed this now, we need to clean up the database tables now to rectify this anomaly.

Can anyone please suggest me ways to achieve this?

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2  
If you SELECT dump(<<column name>>,1016) FROM <<table name>> WHERE <<some condition that shows the problem data>>) for one row of one table that you know has the problem, what binary value is the problem character stored as? If you repeat the test on a few different cases that you're aware of, is the character consistently represented with a particular binary value? –  Justin Cave Feb 21 '12 at 4:49
    
That doesn't necessarily mean that it's garbled - you might be missing the font that displays that character. –  Arafangion Feb 21 '12 at 4:59
    
@Arafangion: That is definitely not the case. As I said, the fix is done and we can view the special characters perfectly for the new incoming records. –  name_masked Feb 21 '12 at 5:05
    
@darkie15 if you do as Justin has suggest you should be able to identify the offending character(s). –  ninesided Feb 21 '12 at 5:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I had a similar problem a while back. Luckily, the number of columns that it affected was limited to a small number, and those columns had the same name throughout the database.

I solved this by writing a script that does the following:

  1. disable foreign key constraints
  2. build up a list of tables which contain the target columns
  3. update all the tables in your list using a REGEXP_REPLACE
  4. commit the data re-enable the constraints

This used a healthy dose of dynamic SQL, pulling data from the user_constraints and user_tab_columns, filtering on the specific column names I was targeting.

Here's a rough skeleton to get you started, I've just thrown it together quickly, so it isn't tested. Also, if you have triggers to worry about, you'll need to disable those too:

-- disable constraints
BEGIN
    FOR c IN (
        SELECT c.owner, c.table_name, c.constraint_name, c.constraint_type
        FROM user_constraints c
        INNER JOIN user_tables t ON (t.table_name = c.table_name)
        AND c.status = 'ENABLED'
        AND c.constraint_type NOT IN ('C', 'P')
        ORDER BY c.constraint_type DESC
    )
    LOOP
        dbms_utility.exec_ddl_statement('alter table '||c.table_name||' disable constraint ' || c.constraint_name);
    END LOOP;
END;

-- do the updates
BEGIN
    FOR t IN (
        SELECT table_name, column_name
        FROM user_tab_columns
        WHERE column_name = 'TEMPERATURE'
        AND data_type = 'VARCHAR2';
    )
    LOOP
        dbms_utility.exec_ddl_statement('UPDATE '||t.table_name||' SET ' ||t.column_name||' = '||''GOOD VALUE''||' WHERE '||t.column_name||' = '||''BAD VALUE'');
    END LOOP;
END;

-- re-enable constraints
BEGIN
    FOR c IN (
        SELECT c.owner, c.table_name, c.constraint_name, c.constraint_type
        FROM user_constraints c
        INNER JOIN user_tables t ON (t.table_name = c.table_name)
        AND c.status = 'DISABLED'
        AND c.constraint_type NOT IN ('C', 'P')
        ORDER BY c.constraint_type ASC
    )
    LOOP
        dbms_utility.exec_ddl_statement('alter table '||c.table_name||' enable constraint ' || c.constraint_name);
    END LOOP;
END;
/
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1  
update all the tables in your list using a REGEXP_REPLACE it will be a bit difficult to find all those symbols, because char is not a particular char but a presentation of the code that is invalid –  zerkms Feb 21 '12 at 4:42
    
@zerkms That depends on how the data got to be garbled in the first place. � is a character, U+FFFD, "REPLACEMENT CHARACTER", which is supposed to be substituted for invalid byte sequences by a Unicode processor. Hence if Java screwed up the import, � may very well be saved as a character in the database because Java put it there. If the data was inserted into the database as binary data and only the output screws up, that would be different. –  deceze Feb 21 '12 at 4:59
    
find a row that you know is broken and use the DUMP function on the target column. This will give you the CHAR codes you're looking for. –  ninesided Feb 21 '12 at 5:11
    
@deceze: Do you mean INSERT INTO .. or inserting through an SQL editor such as Oracle SQL Developer when you say "If the data was inserted into the database as binary data" ?? All the records are inserted through Java i.e. JDBC code. This is the reason I specified that in my question on UTF-8 format. –  name_masked Feb 21 '12 at 5:11
    
@darkie If you insert data into any form of text column, the database most process the encoding to store characters, at which point any invalid bytes would be replaced by �. From what you're saying this already happened on the Java side though, so Java inserted actual � characters. So I meant this simply as opposed to inserting binary data into a BLOB/CLOB column and the data screwing up on output. In that case you might not have specific � characters in the database to replace, but these characters would only be substituted for invalid byte sequences upon display. –  deceze Feb 21 '12 at 5:16

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