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I have a program written to evaluate postfix expressions. I have the code fully functioning with no compiler warnings when I compile and run it from a Windows IDE (Codeblocks), however, when I try to compile the source code in a Linux environment, I get a ton or warnings. They are listed below:

postfix.c: In function ‘infixToPostfix’:
postfix.c:20: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackInit’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:25: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:36: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPush’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:31: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:40: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackIsEmpty’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:37: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:42: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPeek’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:43: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:44: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPeek’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:43: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:45: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPop’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:34: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:49: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPush’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:31: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:54: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPeek’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:43: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:56: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPop’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:34: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:59: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPop’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:34: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:63: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackIsEmpty’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:37: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:65: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPop’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:34: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:69: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackDestroy’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:28: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c: In function ‘evaluatePostfix’:
postfix.c:139: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackInit’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:25: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:146: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPush’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:31: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:150: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPop’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:34: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:151: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPop’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:34: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:154: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPush’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:31: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:159: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackPop’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:34: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
postfix.c:160: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘stackDestroy’ from incompatible pointer type
stack.h:28: note: expected ‘struct stack *’ but argument is of type ‘struct stack **’
/tmp/ccPMgl0G.o: In function `applyOperator':
postfix.c:(.text+0x6bd): undefined reference to `pow'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

They all seem to be related to my postfix.c source and my stack.h header. The postfix.c source I completely modified myself, but the stack.h header was supplied by my instructor. All the errors for the postfix.c source seem to point to lines where I have code in the following manner:

stackInit(&s);

I believe it is referring to my use of the ampersand as a parameter for the function... but there isn't any other way for me to indicate that I am modifying the immediate value of 's' is there? Is there something I should be including before hand? Also... for the 'pow' issue, I have included the header file:

math.h

So it should be able to reference it... I don't know why it won't compile :/ I have been using this to compile my 3 source files together:

gcc prog2.c stack.c postfix.c

Is there another way I should be doing this? Thank you in advance.

Source Code:

/* function to convert an infix to postfix */
char *infixToPostfix(char *infixStr)
{
    static char pfline[30];
    int i;
    stack * s;
    stackInit(&s);

    char * token = strtok(infixStr, " ");

    for(i = 0; i < 30; ++i) {
        pfline[i] = '\0';
    }

    while(token != NULL)
    {
        if(isOperand(token) != 0) {
            strcat(pfline, token);
            strcat(pfline, " ");
        }

        if(isLeftParen(token))
            stackPush(&s, token);

        if(isOperator(token))
        {
            if(!stackIsEmpty(&s))
            {
                if(isOperator(stackPeek(&s)))
                {
                    if(stackPrecedence(stackPeek(&s)) >= inputPrecedence(token))
                        strcat(pfline, stackPop(&s));
                        strcat(pfline, " ");
                }
            }
            stackPush(&s, token);
        }

        if(isRightParen(token))
        {
            while(!isLeftParen(stackPeek(&s)))
            {
                strcat(pfline, stackPop(&s));
                strcat(pfline, " ");
            }
            stackPop(&s);
        }
        token = strtok(NULL, " ");
    }
    while(!stackIsEmpty(&s))
    {
        strcat(pfline, stackPop(&s));
        strcat(pfline, " ");
    }
    printf("%s\n", pfline);
    stackDestroy(&s);
    return pfline;
}

int evaluatePostfix(char *postfixStr)
{
    stack * s;
    int x = 0, y = 0, z = 0;

    stackInit(&s);
    char * token = strtok(postfixStr, " ");

    while(token != NULL)
    {

        if(isOperand(token) != 0)
            stackPush(&s, token);

        if(isOperator(token))
        {
            y = atoi(stackPop(&s));
            x = atoi(stackPop(&s));
            char *str = malloc(10 * sizeof(char));
            sprintf(str, "%d", applyOperator(x, y, token));
            stackPush(&s, str);
        }
        token = strtok(NULL, " ");
    }

    z = atoi(stackPop(&s));
    stackDestroy(&s);
    return z;
}

Here is my stack.h header file that was provided which is an interface for the stack:

/*
 * This is an interface for a stack of strings.
 *
 */

#ifndef _STACK_H
#define _STACK_H

#include <stdbool.h>

typedef char * stkElement;

struct stkNode {
  stkElement element;
  struct stkNode *next;
};

typedef struct stkNode stkNode;

typedef struct {
  stkNode *top;
} stack;

/* function to initialize a new stack variable */
void stackInit(stack *stkPtr);

/* function to free the memory associated with the stack */
void stackDestroy(stack *stkPtr);

/* function to add an element to the top of the stack */
void stackPush(stack *stkPtr, stkElement element);

/* function that removes the element from the top of the stack */
stkElement stackPop(stack *stkPtr);

/* function that returns a true value if the stack is empty */
bool stackIsEmpty(stack *stkPtr);

/* function that returns the number of elements in the stack */
int stackLength(stack *stkPtr);

/* function that returns the top element in the stack without removing it */
stkElement stackPeek(stack *stkPtr);

#endif  /* _STACK_H */
share|improve this question
    
For math you need to link the math library (in case it in not linking as in your case), try gcc prog2.c stack.c postfix.c -lm. As far as the warning go you are passing incorrect type of param. Maybe you need to declare s as struct stack s; & then call stackInit(&s); – another.anon.coward Feb 21 '12 at 5:51
    
you should add -Wall for compilation. show the function declaration of stackInit(&s);, pls. – Bort Feb 21 '12 at 9:44
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It is likely not the call to stackInit() that is actually wrong - rather it is the declaration of s. You are correct that you need to use stackInit(&s); if you want stackInit() to modify the variable s in the calling function, but if stackInit() takes a parameter of type stack * then that indicates that you should be declaring s as:

stack s;
share|improve this answer
    
This produced significantly less errors, but now it tells me that "storage size of s isn't known". What exactly does this mean? – Newwisdom01 Feb 21 '12 at 6:14
    
@Newwisdom01: It means that you can't declare a variable of that type because the full definition of the struct stack isn't in scope. At this point I think we would need to see the code your instructor has provided to give good guidance. – caf Feb 21 '12 at 9:47
    
Okay, I've included the header file that is the interface for the stack. Would it have anything to do with the way stkNodes are defined? Do I have to include some sort of identifier involving them when declaring the stack? – Newwisdom01 Feb 21 '12 at 12:44
    
@Newwisdom01: That makes it clearer. The type is stack, not struct stack, so s should just be declared as stack s;. – caf Feb 21 '12 at 12:48
    
caf, you have been an absolute life saver. Thank you so very much! Could you maybe explain why I am required to use a pointer to the stack in a Windows IDE, but declare just the stack in a Linux environment? Or perhaps my terminology is incorrect, but I just don't understand why I had to make such a change in environments. – Newwisdom01 Feb 21 '12 at 13:33

You didn't post the relevant code, but in order for the error message to make sense, I have to assume that s is a pointer to a stack and stackInit takes a pointer to a stack.

In that case, you should call it as stackInit(s) and calling it as stackInit(&s) is simply wrong. If you really want stackInit to accept a pointer to a pointer to a stack, you should change the declaration to say so (however I can't imagine that that would make sense).

That being said the only actual compile errror here is "undefined reference to 'pow'", which is unrelated to the warnings. That error can be fixed by linking against the math library using the -lm flag to gcc.

share|improve this answer
    
Getting rid of all the ampersands got rid of all the errors, but now my calculations are wrong... it doesn't seem to be getting the proper values when they are popped from the stack :/ I've included the source code at the top of this thread now... assume the ampersands are gone as I removed them in my Linux copy of the source. – Newwisdom01 Feb 21 '12 at 6:09
    
@Newwisdom01 Your code gave incorrect result because you never initialized the pointers you declared. They just pointed at random memory willy nilly. You probably shouldn't have declared them as pointers at all. – sepp2k Feb 21 '12 at 13:57

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