Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I hae written the following code:

class Object
{
   public:
   Object()
   {}
};

template <class T>
class Reg : public Object
{
    T val,val_new;
    public:
    Reg(T initval)
    {
    super( );
    val=initval;
    } 
};

The error in the code is

t.cpp: In constructor 'Reg<T>::Reg(T)':
Line 15: error: there are no arguments to 'super' that depend on a template parameter,
so a declaration of 'super' must be available
compilation terminated due to -Wfatal-errors.

How can i eliminate the error?

share|improve this question
3  
What is super? Where is it defined? (Do you usually code in Java?) –  Mat Feb 21 '12 at 6:50
    
There is no super in C++ as it allow multiple inheritance –  Anycorn Feb 21 '12 at 6:53
    
VC++ has __super keyword for accessing base class (if there's no ambiguity). Other compilers may also have similar keyword. Yes, that's not standard. –  Ajay Feb 21 '12 at 8:31
    
I was not able to add comment(some problem in browser). Super is to call the constructor of parent class.yeah i normally work in java. –  Rog Matthews Feb 21 '12 at 9:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
class Object
{
public:
   Object() {}
};

template <class T>
class Reg : public Object
{
    T val,val_new;
public:
    Reg(T const& initval)
        : val( initval )
    {} 
};

There is no super in standard C++. Some compilers offer it as a language extension, but in standard C++ if you want a generic name for “the” base class, then you have to typedef it. For example, in class Reg you can typedef Object Base;.

The construction : val( initval ) is a constructor initializer list, where essentially you call constructors of members and base classes, avoiding default construction.

Finally, the const&, passing by reference, avoids time-consuming and memory-consuming copying of the actual argument; it's another thing that's different in C++ (compared to Java, which I’m assuming that you’re coming from).

share|improve this answer
class Object
{
   public:
   Object()
   {}
};

template <class T>
class Reg : public Object
{
    T val,val_new;
    public:
    Reg(T initval) : Object() // initializer list
    {
    val=initval;
    } 
};
share|improve this answer
    
Might as well initialize val in the initializer list too while you're at it. –  Mat Feb 21 '12 at 6:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.