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I have some C# code in my ASP.NET MVC3 project that's throwing an exception claiming:

Cannot perform runtime binding on a null reference

The line of code throwing the exception is:

ViewBag.Foo[i].Name = allSpark[i].Users.Name;

This is the code block:

ViewBag.Foo = new myAllSparkModelType[allSpark.Length];
for (int i = 0; i < allSpark.Length; i++)
{
    ViewBag.Foo[i].Name = allSpark[i].Users.Name;
    ...
}

When I set a breakpoint and inspect allSpark[i].Users.Name, it definitely has a value (e.g. "Fred").

If I comment out this line of code, the next line (which is similar code) then throws the same exception.

So the problem is either that allSpark[i].Users.Name is a null reference (Which I've confirmed isn't) or I can't just use the ViewBag like I am. If it's the latter, I'm confused as I thought that the ViewBag could be used this way.

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1  
Can you provide some more code on the creation of the allSpark and ViewBag instance? –  meep Feb 21 '12 at 7:28
1  
How about Foo[i] ? maybe it is null –  Beatles1692 Feb 21 '12 at 7:28
    
Foo[i] must be null , to my understanding –  kommradHomer Feb 21 '12 at 7:29
    
Is Users a collection or just a variable? Can you post your foreach code? –  Bryan Crosby Feb 21 '12 at 7:29
2  
+1 for allspark. Autobots, roll out –  OptimusCrime Feb 21 '12 at 7:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Look at this code:

ViewBag.Foo = new myDataModelType[allSpark.Length];
for (int i = 0; i < allSpark.Length; i++)
{
    ViewBag.Foo[i].Name = ...
    ...
}

ViewBag.Foo is initialized, but each element of ViewBag.Foo will be null, assuming myDataModelType is a class. When you create an array, each element is initialized to the default value of the element type - and for reference types, that default value is null.

You need to create a new object for each element:

for (int i = 0; i < allSpark.Length; i++)
{
    ViewBag.Foo[i] = new myDataModelType();
    ViewBag.Foo[i].Name = ...
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Or, of course, ViewBag.Foo[i] = new myDataModelType { Name = ..., Bar = ... };. Or, if performing more complex operations on the item, var item = new myDataModelType(); // operations on item; ViewBag.Foo[i] = item; to save repeatedly indexing into the array. –  Adam Ralph Feb 21 '12 at 7:44
    
@AdamRalph: Sure - I wanted to keep to minimal changes for the moment, but those are all good things to consider :) –  Jon Skeet Feb 21 '12 at 7:51
    
Thanks! I can't believe I overlooked that. –  TMC Feb 21 '12 at 8:19

Either ViewBag is null and therefore .Foo[i] does not exist or Foo is null and indexing it is not valid or Foo[i] is null and therefore Foo[i].Name is not valid

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+1 Same same conclusion as in my answer :) –  Jonas Stensved Feb 21 '12 at 7:40

If allSpark[i].Users.Name contains a value then it might be referencing the property on the left hand side.

Check to see ifViewBag.Foo exists, and then if it exists at position i.

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+1 but could have been worded a bit better –  Adam Ralph Feb 21 '12 at 7:45

You must create an instance of ViewBag.Foo[i] before assigning Name to it.

ViewBag.Foo = new myDataModelType[allSpark.Length];
for (int i = 0; i < allSpark.Length; i++)
{

ViewBag.Foo[i] = new ObjectThatHasNameProperty();
    ViewBag.Foo[i].Name = allSpark[i].Users.Name;

}

allSpark[i].Users.Name has a value, but ViewBag.Foo[i] does not thus the exception.

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