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I've seen multiple from clauses in a LINQ query a few times now, but have not figured out how that corresponds to a TSQL statement.

var r = from p in products
        from d in departments
        from c in something
        select p;

What does that do?

Does that translate to SQL as SELECT * FROM products, departments, something?

Also, the select in this case is supposed to always be a SelectMany. how do I know when a select actually is a SelectMany?

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(this isn't intended to be as aggressive as it sounds) "how do I know when a select actually is a SelectMany" - why do you care? –  AakashM Feb 21 '12 at 9:18

3 Answers 3

That will translate into code conceptually like this:

var r = products.SelectMany(p => departments, (p, d) = new { p, d })
                .SelectMany(z => something, (z, c) => new { z, c })
                .Select(zz => zz.z.p);

Basically each from after the first one adds an extra call to SelectMany. Actually, in this case the compiler will notice that after the last from clause there's just a select, and it will actually translate to this:

var r = products.SelectMany(p => departments, (p, d) = new { p, d })
                .SelectMany(z => something, (z, c) => z.p);

... but I tend to think of the "logical" form first.

Note that in this case you haven't used the earlier range variables within the from clauses, but you can:

var query = from person in people
            from friend in person.Friends
            select person.Name + " is friends with " + friend.Name;
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How that corresponds to a TSQL statement?

It depends on the way how you use your from clauses. If you use:

var query = from d in context.Departments
            from e in context.Employees
            select d;

Your query will be CROSS JOIN because there is no relation between product and department used. So something like:

SELECT d.* FROM Departments AS d
CROSS JOIN Employees AS e

Obviously you should avoid cross joins. If you instead use navigation property in second from:

var query = from d in context.Departments
            from e in d.Employees
            select d;

you will use either INNER or LEFT JOIN (EF will decide which one to use based on your multiplicity mapping in the relation). So something like:

SELECT d.* FROM Departments AS d
LEFT OUTER JOIN Employees AS e ON d.Id = e.DepartmentId
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In this case it doesn't make any sense to use select (it's not semantically correct, you must use SelectMany)

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