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we have been simplifying some definition and usage of generics in our code. Now we got an interesting case, take this example:

public class MyWeirdClass {

    public void entryPoint() {
        doSomethingWeird();
    }

    @SuppressWarnings( "unchecked" )
    private <T extends A & B> T getMyClass() {
        if ( System.currentTimeMillis() % 2 == 0 ) {
           return (T) new MyClass_1();
        } else {
           return (T) new MyClass_2();
        }
    }

    private <T extends A & B> void doSomethingWeird() {
        T obj = getMyClass();

        obj.methodFromA();
        obj.methodFromB();
    }

    static interface A {
        void methodFromA();
    }

    static interface B {
        void methodFromB();
    }

    static class MyClass_1 implements A, B {
        public void methodFromA() {};
        public void methodFromB() {};
    }

    static class MyClass_2 implements A, B {
        public void methodFromA() {};
        public void methodFromB() {};
    }
}

Now look at the method 'doSeomthingWeird() in MyWeirdClass: This code will compile correctly using the eclipse JDT compiler, however it will fail when using the Oracle compiler. Since the JDT is able to produce working byte-code, it means that at JVM level, this is valid code and it is 'only' the Oracle compiler not allowing to compile such dirty(!?) stuff. We understand that Oracle's compiler won't accept the call 'T obj = getMyClass();' since T is not a really existent type. However since we know that the returned object implements A and B, why not allowing it? (The JDT compiler and the JVM do). Note also that since the generics code is used only internally in private methods, we do not want to expose them at class level, polluting external code with generics definitions, that we are not interested at (from outside the class).

The school book solution will be to create an interface AB extends A,B however since we have a larger number of interfaces which are used in different combinations and coming from different modules, making shared interfaces for all the combinations will significantly increase the number of 'dummy' interfaces and finally make the code less readable. In theory it would require up to N-permutations of different wrapper interfaces in order to cover all the cases. The 'business-oriented-engineer'(other people call it the 'lazy-engineer') solution would be to leave the code this way and start using only JDT for compiling the code. Edit: It's a bug in Oracle's Javac 6 and works without problems also on Oracle's Javac 7

What do you mean? Are there any hidden dangers by adopting this 'strategy'?


Addition in order to avoid discussion on (for me) not relevant points: I am not asking why the code above does not compile on Oracle's compiler I know the reason and I do not want to modify this kind of code without a very good reason if it works perfectly when using another compiler. Please concentrate on the definition and usage (without giving a specific type) of the method 'doSomethingWeird()'. Is there a good reason, why we should not use only the JDT compiler that allows writing and compiling this code and stop compiling with the Oracle's compiler, which will not accept the code above? (Thanks for input)

Edit: The code above compiles correctly on Oracle Javac 7 but not on Javac 6. It is a Javac 6 bug. So this means that there is nothing wrong in our code and we can stick on it. Question is answered, and I'll mark it as such after the two days timeout on my own answer. Thanks everybody for the constructive feedback.

share|improve this question
2  
The oracle compiler is the standard one, that is used by default with external tools (Maven, Ant, etc.) And it seems that the Oracle is right, whereas the Eclipse compiler is wrong and has a bug. There is thus a good chance for this bug to be fixed in future releases, which will make your code completely uncompilable. You don't want that, do you? –  JB Nizet Feb 21 '12 at 9:14
1  
Your example doesn't show the relevance to use generics at all. You introduce a dummy generic, to choose your words, to avoid a dummy interface? I'm sorry - that doesn't make any sense. Looking at your code and without reading your comment, my thought was exactly to create an interface AB, which simplifies the whole thing. Your doSomethingWeird method has a type parameter which is never used, and will always return the same thing, ignoring this useless parameter all together. –  user unknown Feb 21 '12 at 10:10
    
Hi, thanks for the feedback. That's my concern, I do not want to take a risky path, that may lead to some big problem in the future. The problem is, that it is not clear if this is a 'bug' in the JDT compiler or not, from my understanding this is a situation that is not covered by the JLS, so if I'd have some guarantee that at least the JDT, will continue supporting this... feature. Then we may keep some cases in our code with these kind of generics (mis-)usage. I'll better ask this question on the JDT and OpenJDK mailing lists... –  Danilo Tommasina Feb 21 '12 at 12:16
    
@DaniloTommasina There's a whole term for "not covered by the [language spec name here]", it's undefined behaviour. It's not so common in Java since there's way less wiggle room than C++, but there's some cases, this is one of them. To answer your question -- NO, you cannot be sure that the JDT will keep supporting this. It may produce "working" (by your definition anyway) code now, it is free to produce unicorns tomorrow. –  TC1 Feb 21 '12 at 12:37
    
@TC1 yep, I agree with that. I asked on both JDT and OpenJDK-compiler mailing lists... let's see what they think about this ;) –  Danilo Tommasina Feb 21 '12 at 12:47

7 Answers 7

In java you can do generic methods if generic type used in Parameter or Return Type of method signature. In your sample generic doSomethingWeird method but never used it in method signature. see following sample:

class MyWeirdClass
{
    public void entryPoint()
    {
        doSomethingWeird(new MyClass_1());
    }

    private <T extends A & B> T getMyClass()
    {
        if (System.currentTimeMillis() % 2 == 0)
        {
            return (T) new MyClass_1();
        }
        else
        {
            return (T) new MyClass_2();
        }
    }

    private <T extends A & B> void doSomethingWeird(T a)
    {
        T obj = getMyClass();

        obj.methodFromA();
        obj.methodFromB();
    }
}

This code work fine.

JLS(Java Language Specification) says in Generic Method part:

Type parameters of generic methods need not be provided explicitly when a
generic method is invoked. Instead, they are almost always inferred as specified in
§15.12.2.7

By this quotation when you don't use T in doSomethingWeird method signature,What you specify raw type of T in invoking time(in entryPoint method)?

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, this is exactly the point... we do not specify a type when calling doSomethingWeird() (from my original post) and exactly this is the 'hack', which Oracle's compiler does not like (understandably), however the JDT compiler allows it, and my question is: Is there a good reason, why we shouldn't use it, if it boosts our productivity? –  Danilo Tommasina Feb 21 '12 at 8:29
    
Problem is in invoke doSomethingWeird method, not in declaration it. Your comment is true but what happen when you want call doSomethingWeird(You know can't specify method raw type in invoking-time)?What is raw tyoe when you call doSomethingWeird whtout any raw type? –  MJM Feb 21 '12 at 8:34
    
Yeah, I know... there is no clearly defined type when calling 'doSomethingWeird' and this is what the Oracle compiler does not like, however the JDT compiler has no problem with that... however in this case, I do not care having to declare a type when calling the 'doSomethingWeird()' method –  Danilo Tommasina Feb 21 '12 at 8:39
    
I compile your original sample by Eclipse JDk but get compile error. –  MJM Feb 21 '12 at 8:57
1  
Instead of passing a param to doSomethingWeird, you can make an explicit call: this.<MyClass_2>doSomethingWeird(); (I know this is probably not useful design to you). –  Mister Smith Feb 21 '12 at 9:44

I did not check the code (compile with both compilers). There is a lot of weird stuff in language specification at even more basic level (well, check the array declaration...). However, I believe that the design above is little "over-engineered" and if I translate the need correctly, the required functionality can be achieved with Factory pattern or if you are using some IoC framework (Spring?) then lookup method injection can do the magic for you. I think the code will be more intuitive and easy to read and to maintain.

share|improve this answer
    
mmh, forget the part creating instances of MyClass_X, this is just sample code, how the instances are created is irrelevant for my question. Just concentrate of the weird usage of generics for my original definition of the 'doSomethingWeird()' method. This method is using a 'virtual' type that in fact does not exist in a 'common/shared' class, but only as concrete implementations of the A and B interfaces. –  Danilo Tommasina Feb 21 '12 at 8:37

I think the cause is different. That's not true that the type T on line "T obj = getMyClass();" is unknow - in fact, because of definition "T extends A & B", its erasure is A. This is called multiple bounds and following applies: "When a multiple bound is used, the first type mentioned in the bound is used as the erasure of the type variable."

share|improve this answer
    
yes, "T obj = getMyClass();" is known! however the inferred type when calling "doSomethingWeird()" is not known and causes troubles with the Oracle compiler. –  Danilo Tommasina Feb 21 '12 at 9:01
1  
I think this could help, namely the second response : stackoverflow.com/questions/6429843/… –  Rostislav Matl Feb 21 '12 at 9:17
    
@binary_runner: Could you please link to the "second" answer directly? I doubt that the order will always be the same for each user :-) –  A.H. Feb 21 '12 at 9:35
    
sorry, didn't know it I can do it : stackoverflow.com/a/6429894/332517 –  Rostislav Matl Feb 21 '12 at 10:44
    
@binary_runner Thanks for the link. –  Danilo Tommasina Feb 21 '12 at 12:32

Based on @MJM's answer, I suggest you to update the code as below. Then your code will not rely on JVM's type infer.

public void entryPoint() {
    doSomethingWeird(getMyClass());
}

private <T extends A & B> T getMyClass() {
    if (System.currentTimeMillis() % 2 == 0) {
        return (T)new MyClass_1();
    } else {
        return (T)new MyClass_2();
    }
}

private <T extends A & B> void doSomethingWeird(T t) {
    t.methodFromA();
    t.methodFromB();
}
share|improve this answer

I would go again for creating what you called a "dummy" interface AB.

First of all, I don't find it dummy at all. There are two classes with the same common method definitions and at one place you need to use one of them regardless of which one it is actually. That is the exact useage of inheritence. So the interface AB fits perfect here. And generics is the wrong solution here. Generics were never meant to implement inheritance.

Second, defining the interface will remove all the generics stuff in your code, and will make it much more readable. Actually adding an interface (or class) never makes your code less readable. Otherwise, it would be better to put all the code in a single class.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, see it so... if you have N interfaces and several methods with generic code able to work on several different combinations of these you will need N-permutations of different interfaces... in this case (which is also our case) the code will definitely become unreadable. –  Danilo Tommasina Feb 21 '12 at 14:42
    
and you think using generics in this way is more readable? –  adranale Feb 21 '12 at 15:36
    
what is difficult to read in using it that way? Having 10 or more dummy-wrapper-interfaces, writing and maintaining all that unnecessary code divided out in different maven modules... do you really mean that this makes code more readable or better maintainable? The usage of generics here is encapsulated within its class and there is no external exposure of irrelevant stuff, actually I may come to the idea to call it 'a clean design'... :S –  Danilo Tommasina Feb 22 '12 at 7:07
    
ah and by the way... even SMS on mobile phones was never meant as a messaging system for customers, but it turned into it and let telecom companies earn a good lot of money with it. So even if generics were not meant to support this special case, they do and if it boosts our productivity I do not see any reason why we should not use them that way :) –  Danilo Tommasina Feb 22 '12 at 7:19
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is what the OpenJDK guys answered to my question:

These failures are caused by the fact that JDK 6 compiler doesn't implement type-inference correctly. A lot of effort has been put into JDK 7 compiler in order to get rid of all these problems (your program compiles fine in JDK 7). However, some of those inference improvements require source incompatible changes, which is why we cannot backport these fixes in the JDK 6 release.

So this means for us: There is absolutely nothing wrong with our code and is officially supported also by Oracle. We can also stick to this kind of code and use Javac 7 with target=1.6 for our maven builds while development in eclipse will guarantee that we do not use Java 7 APIs :D yaaahyyy!!!

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Your approach is questionable, because the unchecked casts sacrifice runtime type safety. Consider this example:

interface A {
    void methodFromA();
}

interface B {
    void methodFromB();
}

class C implements A { // but not B!
    @Override public void methodFromA() {
        // do something
    }
}

class D implements A, B {
    @Override
    public void methodFromA() {
        // TODO implement

    }
    @Override
    public void methodFromB() {
        // do something
    }
}

class Factory {
    @SuppressWarnings( "unchecked" )
    public static <T extends A & B> T getMyClass() {
        if ( System.currentTimeMillis() % 2 == 0 ) {
           return (T) new C();
        } else {
           return (T) new D();
        }
    }
}

public class Innocent {
    public static <T extends A & B> void main(String[] args) {
        T t = Factory.getMyClass();

        // Sometimes this line throws a ClassCastException
        // really weird, there isn't even a cast here!
        //                         The maintenance programmer
        t.methodFromB();
    }
}

(You may have to run the program several times to see what confused the maintenance programmer.)

Yes, in this simple program the error is rather obvious, but what if the object is passed around half your program until its interface is missed? How would you find out where the bad object came from?

If that didn't convince you, what about this:

class NotQuiteInnocent {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // Sometimes this line throws a ClassCastException
        D d = Factory.getMyClass();
    }
}

Is eliminating a couple interface declarations really worth that?

share|improve this answer
    
Does this code really compile? return (T) new C(); T is not compatible with class C, the compiler should be able to see that and say that the cast is not possible even with the SuppressWarning annotation –  Danilo Tommasina Feb 29 '12 at 12:19
    
ah, by the way... yeah, would it be only a few interfaces, I'd haven't asked the question. :) In our case are many interfaces which themselves contain some generics declarations. –  Danilo Tommasina Feb 29 '12 at 12:22
    
Of course it compiles, feel free to test this (I have!). –  meriton Feb 29 '12 at 13:33

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