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For the life of me, I can't remember how to set, delete, toggle or test a bit in a bitfield. Either I'm unsure or I mix them up because I rarely need these. So a "bit-cheat-sheet" would be nice to have.

For example:

flags = flags | FlagsEnum.Bit4;  // Set bit 4.

or

if ((flags & FlagsEnum.Bit4)) == FlagsEnum.Bit4) // Is there a less verbose way?

Can you give examples of all the other common operations, preferably in C# syntax using a [Flags] enum?

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4  
This has been answered before here –  Greg Rogers Sep 18 '08 at 15:48
2  
too bad that link doesn't appear in the question hints for this topic. –  cori Sep 18 '08 at 15:52
5  
That question is tagged for c/c++, though, so someone searching for info about C# would probably not look there even though the syntax appears to be the same. –  Adam Lassek Sep 18 '08 at 16:11
    
I'm not aware of a less verbose way to do the bit test –  Andy Johnson May 17 '11 at 15:37
1  
@Andy, there's an API for the bit test in .NET 4 now. –  Drew Noakes May 30 '11 at 17:48

9 Answers 9

up vote 31 down vote accepted
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1  
I'll be cheeky and add my own post: anotherchris.net/csharp/… –  Chris S Feb 28 '13 at 23:54
    
Nice list, but the third link has moved to blog.typps.com/2007/10/… –  Zaq Dec 24 '13 at 18:15
    
@user1494396: updated, thank you very much. –  alexandrul Dec 24 '13 at 22:59
2  
While this answer was written in 2008, when the standards were different it would be great if you could include essential parts of some of the links here, on this site, or your post risks being deleted See the FAQ where it mentions answers that are 'barely more than a link'. You may still include the link if you wish, but only as a 'reference'. The answer should stand on its own without needing the link. –  bluefeet Feb 26 at 4:11
    
@bluefeet: I partly agree with that FAQ entry. In this particular case I either have to create a cheatsheet from all the sources (which is not trivial), or just throw some partly relevant parts from the linked pages. IMHO, you can learn a lot more by visiting the links, so my answer will remain in the current form. –  alexandrul Feb 26 at 10:20

I did some more work on these extensions - You can find the code here

I wrote some extension methods that extend System.Enum that I use often... I'm not claiming that they are bulletproof, but they have helped... Comments removed...

namespace Enum.Extensions {

    public static class EnumerationExtensions {

        public static bool Has<T>(this System.Enum type, T value) {
            try {
                return (((int)(object)type & (int)(object)value) == (int)(object)value);
            } 
            catch {
                return false;
            }
        }

        public static bool Is<T>(this System.Enum type, T value) {
            try {
                return (int)(object)type == (int)(object)value;
            }
            catch {
                return false;
            }    
        }


        public static T Add<T>(this System.Enum type, T value) {
            try {
                return (T)(object)(((int)(object)type | (int)(object)value));
            }
            catch(Exception ex) {
                throw new ArgumentException(
                    string.Format(
                        "Could not append value from enumerated type '{0}'.",
                        typeof(T).Name
                        ), ex);
            }    
        }


        public static T Remove<T>(this System.Enum type, T value) {
            try {
                return (T)(object)(((int)(object)type & ~(int)(object)value));
            }
            catch (Exception ex) {
                throw new ArgumentException(
                    string.Format(
                        "Could not remove value from enumerated type '{0}'.",
                        typeof(T).Name
                        ), ex);
            }  
        }

    }
}

Then they are used like the following

SomeType value = SomeType.Grapes;
bool isGrapes = value.Is(SomeType.Grapes); //true
bool hasGrapes = value.Has(SomeType.Grapes); //true

value = value.Add(SomeType.Oranges);
value = value.Add(SomeType.Apples);
value = value.Remove(SomeType.Grapes);

bool hasOranges = value.Has(SomeType.Oranges); //true
bool isApples = value.Is(SomeType.Apples); //false
bool hasGrapes = value.Has(SomeType.Grapes); //false
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13  
Absolutely brilliant. :) –  Jakob Gade Jul 28 '09 at 9:58
1  
I also found this useful - Any ideas how I can modify it so it works on any underlying type? –  Charlie Salts Feb 14 '10 at 5:10
3  
These extensions just made my day, my week, my month, and quite possibly my year. –  thaBadDawg Mar 3 '10 at 22:39
4  
@Drew: See code.google.com/p/unconstrained-melody for a way of avoiding boxing :) –  Jon Skeet Sep 19 '11 at 21:56
3  
@Hugoware +1 for the awesome 404 –  Chuk Diesel May 22 '12 at 4:07

The idiom is to use the bitwise or-equal operator to set bits:

flags |= 0x04;

To clear a bit, the idiom is to use bitwise and with negation:

flags &= ~0x04;

Sometimes you have an offset that identifies your bit, and then the idiom is to use these combined with left-shift:

flags |= 1 << offset;
flags &= ~(1 << offset);
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In .NET 4 you can now write:

flags.HasFlag(FlagsEnum.Bit4)
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1  
+1 for pointing that out, although FlagsEnum is an ugly name. :) –  Jim Schubert Jul 19 '11 at 14:25
    
@Jim, perhaps. It's just a sample name, as used in the original question, so you're free to change it in your code. –  Drew Noakes Jul 20 '11 at 7:46
11  
I know! But ugly names are like IE6 and will probably never go away :( –  Jim Schubert Jul 20 '11 at 20:18
1  
@JimSchubert, again, I just reproduced the type name from the original question so as not to confuse the issue. The .NET Enumeration Type Naming Guidelines indicate that all [Flags] enums should have pluralised names, so the name FlagsEnum has even more serious issues than ugliness. –  Drew Noakes Jan 16 '13 at 11:48
    
I also recommend Framework Design Guidelines: Conventions, Idioms, and Patterns for Reusable .NET Libraries. It is a little expensive to buy, but I believe Safari Online and Books24x7 both offer it for subscribers. –  Jim Schubert Jan 16 '13 at 14:34

@Drew

Note that except in the simplest of cases, the Enum.HasFlag carries a heavy performance penalty in comparison to writing out the code manually. Consider the following code:

[Flags]
public enum TestFlags
{
    One = 1,
    Two = 2,
    Three = 4,
    Four = 8,
    Five = 16,
    Six = 32,
    Seven = 64,
    Eight = 128,
    Nine = 256,
    Ten = 512
}


class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        TestFlags f = TestFlags.Five; /* or any other enum */
        bool result = false;

        Stopwatch s = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
        {
            result |= f.HasFlag(TestFlags.Three);
        }
        s.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(s.ElapsedMilliseconds); // *4793 ms*

        s.Restart();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
        {
            result |= (f & TestFlags.Three) != 0;
        }
        s.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(s.ElapsedMilliseconds); // *27 ms*        

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Over 10 million iterations, the HasFlags extension method takes a whopping 4793 ms, compared to the 27 ms for the standard bitwise implementation.

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5  
Whilst certainly interesting and good to point out. You do need to consider the usage. According to this if you aren't performing a couple hundred thousand or more ops you probably aren't even going to notice this. –  Joshua Hayes Oct 27 '11 at 12:28
2  
The HasFlag method involves boxing/unboxing, which accounts for this difference. But the cost is so trivial (0.4µs) that unless you're in a tight loop, I would take the more readable (and less likely buggy) declarative API call any day. –  Drew Noakes Oct 15 '12 at 23:57
    
Depending on usage, it could be an issue. And since I work with loaders quite a bit, I figured it was good to point out. –  wraith808 Oct 25 '12 at 21:56

C++ syntax, assuming bit 0 is LSB, assuming flags is unsigned long:

Check if Set:

flags & (1UL << (bit to test# - 1))

Check if not set:

invert test !(flag & (...))

Set:

flag |= (1UL << (bit to set# - 1))

Clear:

flag &= ~(1UL << (bit to clear# - 1))

Toggle:

flag ^= (1UL << (bit to set# - 1))
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This was inspired by using Sets as indexers in Delphi, way back when:

/// Example of using a Boolean indexed property
/// to manipulate a [Flags] enum:

public class BindingFlagsIndexer
{
  BindingFlags flags = BindingFlags.Default;

  public BindingFlagsIndexer()
  {
  }

  public BindingFlagsIndexer( BindingFlags value )
  {
     this.flags = value;
  }

  public bool this[BindingFlags index]
  {
    get
    {
      return (this.flags & index) == index;
    }
    set( bool value )
    {
      if( value )
        this.flags |= index;
      else
        this.flags &= ~index;
    }
  }

  public BindingFlags Value 
  {
    get
    { 
      return flags;
    } 
    set( BindingFlags value ) 
    {
      this.flags = value;
    }
  }

  public static implicit operator BindingFlags( BindingFlagsIndexer src )
  {
     return src != null ? src.Value : BindingFlags.Default;
  }

  public static implicit operator BindingFlagsIndexer( BindingFlags src )
  {
     return new BindingFlagsIndexer( src );
  }

}

public static class Class1
{
  public static void Example()
  {
    BindingFlagsIndexer myFlags = new BindingFlagsIndexer();

    // Sets the flag(s) passed as the indexer:

    myFlags[BindingFlags.ExactBinding] = true;

    // Indexer can specify multiple flags at once:

    myFlags[BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Static] = true;

    // Get boolean indicating if specified flag(s) are set:

    bool flatten = myFlags[BindingFlags.FlattenHierarchy];

    // use | to test if multiple flags are set:

    bool isProtected = ! myFlags[BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic];

  }
}
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This even does not compile if BindingFlags is byte enum: this.flags &= ~index; –  amuliar Nov 20 '13 at 12:41

To test a bit you would do the following: (assuming flags is a 32 bit number)

Test Bit:

if((flags & 0x08) == 0x08)
(If bit 4 is set then its true) Toggle Back (1 - 0 or 0 - 1):
flags = flags ^ 0x08;
Reset Bit 4 to Zero:
flags = flags & 0xFFFFFF7F;

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1  
-1 since this does not even bother with enums? Plus, hand-coding the values is fragile... I would at least write ~0x08 instead of 0xFFFFFFF7... (the actual mask for 0x8) –  Ben Mosher Jun 21 '12 at 15:22
    
At first I was thinking that Ben's -1 was harsh, but the use of "0xFFFFFF7F" does make this an especially poor example. –  ToolmakerSteve Mar 18 at 23:25

C++ operations are: & | ^ ~ (for and, or, xor and not bitwise operations). Also of interest are >> and <<, which are bitshift operations.

So, to test for a bit being set in a flag, you would use: if (flags & 8) //tests bit 4 has been set

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6  
Question relates to c#, not c++ –  Andy Johnson May 17 '11 at 15:38
    
On the other hand, C# uses the same operators: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6a71f45d.aspx –  ToolmakerSteve Mar 18 at 23:18

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