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I would like to calculate the remaining minutes to the "next" half an hour or hour.

Say i get a start time string of 07:15, i want it to calculate the remaining minutes to the nearest half an hour (07:30).

That would be 15min.

Then i can also have an instance where the start time can be 07:45 and i want it to calculate the remaining minutes to the nearest hour (08:00).

That would also be 15min.

So any string less then 30min in a hour would calculate to the nearest half an hour (..:30) and any string over 30min would calculate to the nearest hour (..:00).

I don't want to do a bunch of if statements, because i get from time strings that can start from and minute in an hour.

This is what i do not want to do:

if (int.Parse(fromTimeString.Right(2)) < 30)
{
    //Do Calculation
}
else
{
    //Do Calculation
}

public static string Right(this String stringValue, int noOfCharacters)
{
    string result = null;

    if (stringValue.Length >= noOfCharacters)
    {
        result = stringValue.Substring(stringValue.Length - noOfCharacters,       noOfCharacters);
    }
    else
    {
        result = "";
    }

    return result;
}

Is there not an easier way with linq or with the DateTime class

share|improve this question
2  
Do you really mean "nearest", or do you actually mean "next"? In most of your examples you seem to be calculating the amount of remaining time until the next half-hour. This is not necessarily the nearest one, as that could be at an earlier time. –  Mark Byers Feb 21 '12 at 9:11
    
@MarkByers Sorry, i mean "next". –  Willem Feb 21 '12 at 9:12
    
If the input is "08:30" should the output be "30" or "0"? –  Mark Byers Feb 21 '12 at 9:15
    
@MarkByers It will be 30 and the same for 08:00. The output will be 30 as well. –  Willem Feb 21 '12 at 9:18

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use modulo operator % with 30. Your result will be equal to (60 - currentMinutes) % 30. About LINQ its used for collections so i can't realy see how it can be used in your case.

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You beat me in few seconds, great answer! –  Dor Cohen Feb 21 '12 at 9:12
    
+1 for simplicity! –  Asken Feb 21 '12 at 9:52

You can use this DateTime tick-round approach to get the timespan until next half hour:

var minutes = 30;
var now = DateTime.Now;
var ticksMin = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(minutes).Ticks;
DateTime rounded = new DateTime(((now.Ticks + (ticksMin/2)) / ticksMin) * ticksMin);
var diff=rounded-now;
var minUntilNext = diff.TotalMinutes > 0 ? diff.TotalMinutes : minutes + diff.TotalMinutes;
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var minutesToNextHalfHour = (60 - yourDateTimeVariable.Minutes) % 30;
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1  
Why down vote to this? –  Maheep Feb 21 '12 at 9:22
    
This will return 30 when Minutes = 0 or Minutes = 30. –  Tim Rogers Feb 21 '12 at 10:05
    
Thanks. updated the answer –  Maheep Feb 21 '12 at 10:09
1  
If seconds are considered, it is incorrect for hour boundary. e.g. For 11:00:25, this will return 11:00:00 rather than 11:30:00. –  Hemant Jul 31 '13 at 8:21
var hhmm = fromTimeString.Split(':');
var mins = int.Parse(hhmm[1]);
var remainingMins = (60 - mins) % 30;
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var str = "7:16";
var datetime = DateTime.ParseExact(str, "h:mm", new CultureInfo("en-US"));
var minutesPastHalfHour = datetime.Minute % 30;
var minutesBeforeHalfHour = 30 - minutesPastHalfHour;
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I would use modulo + TimeSpan.TryParse:

public static int ComputeTime(string time)
{
    TimeSpan ts;

    if (TimeSpan.TryParse(time, out ts))
    {
        return (60 - ts.Minutes) % 30;
    }

    throw new ArgumentException("Time is not valid", "time");
}

private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string test1 = "7:27";
    string test2 = "7:42";

    Console.WriteLine(ComputeTime(test1));
    Console.WriteLine(ComputeTime(test2));

    Console.ReadLine();
}
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This should do it:

int remainingMinutes = (current.Minute >= 30)
    ? 60 - current.Minute
    : 30 - current.Minute;
share|improve this answer
    
For 8:00 result will be 30 and for 8:30 it will be 0. You might want to use >= –  Piotr Auguscik Feb 21 '12 at 9:35
    
@Piotr: Great remark, thx! –  Roy Dictus Feb 21 '12 at 9:59

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