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I'm using spring, hibernate and maven for the project.

I had one class below

@Service
public class  ServiceImpl implements Service ,Serializable{
   //Code
}

in this class I had one method declare as the one below,

@Transactional(rollbackFor = Exception.class, propagation = Propagation.REQUIRES_NEW, readOnly = false)
public void doSomething(Obj a, Obj b){
    //code
}

I do a JUnit test of this method.

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(locations = {"classpath:com/mt/sm/application-context.xml", "classpath:com/mt/sm/security-context.xml"})
@TransactionConfiguration(transactionManager = "transactionManager", defaultRollback = true)
@Transactional
public class ServiceImplTest {
    @Test
    public void testdoSomething() {
        //code
    }
}

I got this error below

Testcase: testdoSomething(com.mt.sm.services.ServiceImplTest):  Caused an ERROR
Could not commit JPA transaction; nested exception is javax.persistence.RollbackException: Transaction marked as rollbackOnly org.springframework.transaction.TransactionSystemException: Could not commit JPA transaction; nested exception is javax.persistence.RollbackException: Transaction marked as rollbackOnly

But in the same way I declare one more method to call the one above

public void call (Obj a, Obj b) {
    doSomething(a,b);
}

@Transactional(rollbackFor = Exception.class, propagation = Propagation.REQUIRES_NEW, readOnly = false)
public void doSomething(Obj a, Obj b){
    //code
}

for the result, I can run a test. I just want to ask why this is working without errors.

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1 Answer 1

Spring manages transactions via AOP Proxies, so inner calls all never transactional (you can't proxy yourself)

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