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I am looking for a way to have javac emit warnings for code source that can be migrated from level 6 to level 7 so that I can have the code to be in level 7 mode?

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Isn't Java 6 forward compatible with 7? I would expect to recompile with 7 and things to just work. Have you tried to compile with 7? Did you get errors? –  SteveD Feb 21 '12 at 10:07
    
Do you have any specific compatibility issue in mind? –  Alexis Dufrenoy Feb 21 '12 at 10:21
    
for example, a compiler warning that would tell me that instead of Map<String, List<String>> myMap = new HashMap<String, List<String>>(); I can write Map<String, List<String>> myMap = new HashMap<>(); –  jts Feb 21 '12 at 10:27
    
I don't know if you can made the compiler print this kind of warning. Btw with netbeans you can easily see them because it marks a warning on the line every time the conversion can be done. –  alain.janinm Feb 21 '12 at 10:40
    
I cannot answer my own question, but the solution is in Eclipse: eclipse.org/jdt/ui/r3_8/Java7news/whats-new-java-7.html –  jts Feb 21 '12 at 10:55

3 Answers 3

I'm reading the question as "how can I detect code that can be migrated from Java 6 paradigms to Java 7 paradigms". Examples might be use of the diamond operator:

List<Foo> bar = new ArrayList<>(); // instead of new ArrayList<Foo>()

And multicatch:

try { }
catch (FooException | BarException e) { }
/*
Instead of:
catch (FooException e) { }
catch (BarException e) { }
*/

If that's the case, a source code style checker (such as PMD, etc) should be able to highlight these opportunities.

For example, the NetBeans EasyPMD plugin routinely flags these two particular cases (as well as others, I'm sure) and offers suggestions for conversion to JDK 7 equivalents. Where a pre-JDK-7 code structure is discovered it is highlighted with a warning icon, and clicking the icon gives a suggested refactor to the JDK-7 equivalent.

I guess it's not really part of the compilation process per se (although you could automate it as part of the build process using Ant, for example), but it's the next best thing.

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That's a good idea. –  Alexis Dufrenoy Feb 21 '12 at 15:21

This article should help you:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/compatibility-417013.html

However, incompatibilities should be minor. Your first step should be to compile your source code with a Java 7 compiler.

Going through the article, I would say the main incompatibiliy on language level is the difference of behavior with inherited exceptions (second item in the list). The others are differences in the libraries.

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Thx. I meant for example, a compiler warning that would tell me that instead of Map<String, List<String>> myMap = new HashMap<String, List<String>>(); I can write Map<String, List<String>> myMap = new HashMap<>(); –  jts Feb 21 '12 at 10:26
up vote 0 down vote accepted

solution

Basically you can configure Eclipse to emit warnings for specific JDK 7 features that can be used

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Please provide context for the link you have provided. –  animuson Feb 23 '12 at 19:11
    
some explanation about the link is good to have –  Balaswamy Vaddeman Feb 24 '12 at 10:51

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