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All,

I use JSLint to validate my JS files. In my most recent project, I am using the following format to set default values for a number of JavaScript functions (further detailed here):

function(a, b, option) {
    option = arguments.length > 2 ? option : "some default value";
    // ...
}

This however causes the latest build of JSLint to produce the following error:

"Do not mutate parameter 'option' when using 'arguments'."

I am aware that using the more common method for assigning defaults (i.e., option = option || {};) supresses the error; however, this will produce incorrect behaviour if I intend to pass a falsey value to option.

Is the only solution to this issue to introduce a new variable? e.g.:

var option2 = arguments.length > 2 ? option : "some default value";
share|improve this question
    
A local variable, which is your "introduce a second parameter" is a better solution. – Biswanath Feb 21 '12 at 10:23
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I guess JSLint warns you since you try to modify one of the input arguments by using a check with the arguments keyword. JSHint, however, does give me any warning when trying your code.

A solution to your problem would be to check if option is defined or not, that way you go around the problem with sending in falsy values:

function(a, b, option) {
    if(typeof option === "undefined") {
        option = "some default value"; 
    }
    // ...
}

If you find that it is cumbersome to write this typeof check everytime, create an isDef function:

function isDef(param) {
    return typeof param !== "undefined";
}
function(a, b, option) {
    option = isDef(option) ? option : "some default value"; 
    // ...
}

// Simon A.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion - removing the risk of specifying an incorrect value for arguments.length is a big plus. Unfortunately, using this method causes JSLint to produce the the same error. – robyaw Feb 21 '12 at 11:33
    
Are you sure? JSLint doesn't complain when I run the two code snippets above. – Netlight_Digital_Media Feb 21 '12 at 11:54
    
Turns out we can both be right, depending on the situation. In my code, I have a function with two parameters requiring defaults to be set. I was using your solution only on the first one (for testing purposes), leaving the second still using the arguments variable. This caused JSLint to raise the error against both parameters - very strange! – robyaw Feb 21 '12 at 12:04

In most situations you'd be better off just doing:

function(a, b, option) {
    option = option || "some default value";
    // ...
}

or

function(a, b, option) {
    if ( !option || typeof option !== 'string' ) { 
        option = "some default value";
    }
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer

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