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ok so I have a base type:

ProductBase

and then i have some products:

Product1: ProductBase

Product2: ProductBase

Product3: ProductBase

Then a factory class:

public class productFactory
    {
        public productBase GetProduct(Enums.product buildProduct)
        {

            var outProduct = new ProductBase();
            switch (buildProduct)
            {
                case Enums.Products.Product1:
                    outMis = new Product1();
                    break;

                case Enums.Products.Product2:
                    outMis = new Product2();
                    break;

                default:
                    outMis = new Product1();
                    break;

            }

            return outProduct;
        }
    }

I know windsor can do this, I know this is a good thing.

As far as I can see productBase will need to be an interface, with the products implementing it, but then I need to make them via the enum switch in windsor?

Help and pointers (links) appreciated. This is in a MVC.net 3 project and I have windsor setup for the controllers and logging, so that bit I get - though clearly a massive gap in my understanding of IoC and DI!

One way of doing it is this, in place of the productFactory

going to answer my own question - from here: http://codeblitz.wordpress.com/2009/05/06/using-factory-method-pattern-with-systemactivator/

instead of using the productFactory:

public class productFactory
{
    public static MisProduct CreateProduct(Enums.Product productType)
    {
        string assemblyName = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetName().Name;
        //creates an instance based on the enum name 
        ProductBase myProduct = Activator.CreateInstance(
            null,
            string.Format("{0}.Models.Products.{1}", assemblyName, productType)
            ).Unwrap() as ProductBase;
        if (myProduct == null)
        {
            //todo throw an Exception here.
        }
        return myProduct;
    }
}

any more suggestions anyone?

share|improve this question
    
going to answer my own question - from here: codeblitz.wordpress.com/2009/05/06/… instead of using the productFactory: –  nathfy Feb 21 '12 at 13:14

2 Answers 2

I suggest you Typed Factory

You may resolve the needed concrete type by id or type itself, that depends on how you receive the parameter that helps to make the concrete choice.

Base on your sample, enumerator may be related to component id.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll try this and report back - thanks –  nathfy Feb 23 '12 at 9:33

How about to use something like this:

public class ProductFactory
{
    public T Create<T>() where T : ProductBase, new()
    {
        return new T();
    }
}

But I think your question has nothing to do with dependenci injection.

Edit: If you need to use castle for Products creation then you can use something like this:

public interface IProductFactory
{
    T Create<T>() where T : ProductBase, new();
    void Destroy(ProductBase obj)
}

public class ProductFactory : IProductFactory
{
    private readonly WindsorContainer _container;

    public ProductFactory(WindsorContainer container)
    {
         _container = container;
    }

    public T Create<T>() where T : ProductBase, new()
    {
        return _container.Resolve<T>();
    }

    public void Destroy(ProductBase obj)
    {
        _container.Release(obj);
    }
}

You need to register IProductFactory with ProductFactory and it should work. Sorry if they are some mistakes in code but I don't have a Visual Studio now to test it.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm new to DI, so can you explain a bit more as to why I wouldn't do this via castle windsor? would it not be preferable to have it create the object when I need it? –  nathfy Feb 22 '12 at 10:05
    
From your question it sounds like you only solving problem with factory. And I think my solution is the simplest one. I am assuming that you only want to create Products via constructor. For this you don't need to use Castle because there are no dependencies to inject into your Products objects. But if you need to use castle for creating objects see edited answer above. –  eXist Feb 22 '12 at 16:08
2  
@eXist sorry but have a component depending on the container itself is definitely an anti-pattern and there's no reason for doing that. As per my answer, using a Typed factory you obtain same result without writing any code and having the framework(Windsor) doing the same job for you but transparently from the component point of view. –  Cristiano Degiorgis Feb 23 '12 at 8:00
    
@Cristiano yeah I know that it is the same like the Typed Factory you mentioned in your answer, but I am only trying to explain what happened under the hood. And I think it is not that bad to have dependency on the container in infrastructural thing like this factory. Use Typed Factory is definitely the best solution. –  eXist Feb 23 '12 at 9:47

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