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I have an interface and a class that implements that interface.

I have a requirement that the class has a dependency on ITimer. A private member is created and a constructor argument is passed in and the private member is assigned to that constructor parameter.

How do I make it so that the interface has this ITimer declared somehow but not as a property? Its not as if I can't test MyClass properly but I thought the interface was supposed to be a contract that the class must adhere to therefore my class has a dependency so how do I make this appear in the interface?

public interface IMyInterface
{
  void DoSomething();
}

public class MyClass : IMyInterface
{
  private ITimer MyTimer;

  public MyClass(ITimer timer)
  {
    MyTimer = timer;
  }

  public void DoSomething()
  {

  }
}
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1  
It sounds like you want to be able to have the interface enforce that all implementing classes have a constructor that takes an ITimer, is that right? (you won't be able to do this with an interface, btw) –  AakashM Feb 21 '12 at 11:59
    
@AakashM Exactly! –  Jon Feb 21 '12 at 12:14
    
Not technically the answer to the posed question, but as a solution to your problem. How about defining MyClassBase (an abstract base class/type) and coding against it (vs an interface) ? –  Gishu Feb 22 '12 at 7:06
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This cannot be done with an interface in C#. What you could do is to inherit from an abstract class instread of an interface.

public abstract class AMyClass
{
  protected ITimer MyTimer;

  public AMyClass(ITimer timer)
  {
    MyTimer = timer;
  }

  public abstract void DoSomething();
}

public class MyClass : AMyClass
{
  public override void DoSomething()
  {

  }
}
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Yes -- this is the correct answer for what the asker is looking for. An interface cannot define how an object is constructed because it -- by definition -- does not define the implementation. However, one thing to remember is that it's OK to have an implementation that doesn't look just like the interface because the interface is just for consumers. So, either go with a base abstract class -- that can even inherit from the interface -- or keep the implementation different. If you have any questions let us know. –  Michael Perrenoud Feb 21 '12 at 12:58
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This will not work, and it is good, that it will not work:

Your dependency on ITimer is not part of the interface, it is part of your implementation of the interface - so having this hidden from the interface is the right thing.

If ALL implementations of the interface need a dependency on ITimer (and only if so), then your interface declaration should be appended to care for that.

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And how would you do that without making the dependency a property? –  Jon Feb 21 '12 at 12:06
    
This ofcourse depends on waht your code does, but I'd probaly go with parameter-less constructor and a setTimer() method that is part of the interface. –  Eugen Rieck Feb 21 '12 at 12:10
    
I think an ITimer in the constructor is still appropriate but having a method in the interface called SetTimer() is a good idea as it shows that a timer is required. It obviosuly doesnt expose ITimer as a interface dependency but maybe its one step closer to ensure all class implementations use a timer –  Jon Feb 21 '12 at 12:16
    
Again, without insight of what the code really does, I don't have a solid base to judge from. –  Eugen Rieck Feb 21 '12 at 12:28
    
Well for example if the interface has a UseTimer property and in the DoSomething method if its true it sets up a timer –  Jon Feb 21 '12 at 12:31
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Why is property not appropriate? You can have a property with a private setter which does exactly what you need, it seems.

Other option is to derive both from an abstract base class with protected Timer and implement the interface at the same time.

Theoretically Dependency Injection is what you are looking for. So may be having a look at Inversion of Control containers might be worth the time.

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Also a very good answer! –  Michael Perrenoud Feb 21 '12 at 12:58
    
If you had a private setter in the class it would not implement the interface as it has to be public. The abstract class I guess is the correct answer though –  Jon Feb 22 '12 at 11:31
    
Why don't you want to add smth like this? interface IMyInterface { int ITimer MyTimer { get; } } internal class MyClass IMyInterface { public ITimer MyTimer { get; set; } } –  Yurii Hohan Feb 22 '12 at 12:05
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If you have a dependency such as ITimer that you explicitly don't want on the interface, then it sounds like an implementation detail, so it is correct that it isn't defined as part of the contract. One approach is "forget about ITimer; only some implementations might need it, and that is the concern of an IoC/DI resolver".

Constructors are not part of the interface, obviously. The only other thing I can think of (while keeping IMyInterface off the API) is to have an IMyInterfaceFactory interface, with a Create method that takes an ITimer - but that is then forcing a particular set of dependencies, which may not reflect the actual implementations.

If none of the above suite, and ITimer is essentially part of the interface, I'd make it formally part of the interface.

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If you make it part of the interface though, you make it public and you wouldn't want to allow users to change parts of ITimer. Saying that you may need to expose properties like Interval so I guess if you make visible some things then I guess it may be ok to expose the whole timer –  Jon Feb 21 '12 at 12:17
    
@Jon the internals of ITimer I leave entirely to ITimer. You don't show how it is defined, so I can't commend on anything about it. –  Marc Gravell Feb 21 '12 at 12:52
    
At the moment it exposes all properties of System.Timers.Timer –  Jon Feb 21 '12 at 13:00
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An interface is a contract to a capability that a class exposes. If there's no natural place for ITimer in the interface, then it looks like an implementation detail in a specific class that implements it, and as such, should remain in the class.

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If a class can implement your interface without using ITimer, does it not adhere to the interface? It obviously does.

The use of ITimer is an implementation detail, and so it shouldn't be represented in the interface.

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