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I have a string with this format MM/YY, MM can be 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 and YY can be 10 to 99 what is the regex corresponding.

I thought ^\d\d/\d\d$

edit :
From the comment bellow I don't recommand to use regex to make a strict validation of a DateTime. But in my case a simple match can be done.

edit : I changed the title because people some people can be maniac

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3  
I'm sure someone will answer your question as written, but validating DateTimes with regex is the wrong tool for the job. –  Widor Feb 21 '12 at 12:31
    
What dialect of regex do you want to use? Basic? Extended? PCRE? –  ghoti Feb 21 '12 at 12:32
3  
Just as you don't want months >12, you also don't want to match days that are greater than the allowed value for the particular month, and you'll need to take leap years into account. As Widor said, regex is the wrong tool. –  ghoti Feb 21 '12 at 12:33
    
Which programming language? –  stema Feb 21 '12 at 12:41
    
I know that regex is a wrong tecno for datetime validation but here I know the format and I just want to check the <=12 validity –  Christophe Debove Feb 21 '12 at 12:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have a try with:

^(?:0[1-9]|1[012])/\d\d$

or if the first 0 is optional:

^(?:0?[1-9]|1[012])/\d\d$
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Thank you my first 0 wasn't optional but as you give two valid answer it's ok –  Christophe Debove Feb 21 '12 at 12:55
    
@ChristopheDebove: You're welcome. –  M42 Feb 21 '12 at 12:56

This will allow only 1 to 12 (or 01 to 12): ^(0?[1-9]|1[012])$

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Write all possibilities (it's not so long):

^(0\d|10|11|12)/\d\d$
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thank you for your participation, but not so good –  Christophe Debove Feb 21 '12 at 13:03

You could try something like this ^(0|1)\d{1}/\d{2}$ if your months may have leading zeroes. Otherwise ^1?\d{1}\/d{2}$ should do the trick.

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