Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have 2 stored procedures: up_proc1 and up_proc2.

This is (a simplified version of) up_proc2:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.up_proc2 
    @id_campaign uniqueidentifier, @id_subcampaign uniqueidentifier, 
    @id_lead uniqueidentifier, @offer NVARCHAR(1000) = NULL
AS  
   SET NOCOUNT ON

   DECLARE @id UNIQUEIDENTIFIER

   SELECT @id = id FROM prospects WHERE id_lead = @id_lead 
        AND id_campaign = @id_campaign AND id_subcampaign = @id_subcampaign
   IF @id IS NULL
   BEGIN
           SET @id = newid ()
           INSERT INTO prospects (id, id_campaign, id_subcampaign, id_lead, offer) 
             values (@id, @id_campaign, @id_subcampaign, @id_lead, @offer)
   END
   ELSE
   BEGIN
           UPDATE prospects set offer = @offer WHERE id=@id
   END

   SELECT @id AS ID
GO

From up_proc1 I call up_proc2. What I would like to achieve is to store the @id of up_proc2 in a variable declared in up_proc1. Is this possible without using an output parameter?

This is how up_proc1 looks like:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.up_proc1
AS  
   SET NOCOUNT ON

   DECLARE @fromProc2 UNIQUEIDENTIFIER

   -- NOT WORKING
   -- select @fromProc2 = exec up_insertProspects [snip]

   -- ALSO NOT WORKING
   -- exec @fromProc2 = up_insertProspects [snip]
share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to avoid an output parameter? This is exactly what they're for. –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 21 '12 at 13:15
    
I'm not very experienced with sql. up_proc2 is an existing stored procedure. I'm not sure if adding an output parameter will not break any existing functionality? up_proc2 is also called from C# code. Will I have to add that output parameter to the list of parameters when calling that stored procedure from C#? If not, then I could probably indeed use an output parameter. –  TweeZz Feb 21 '12 at 13:27
    
Yes, you can add a nullable output parameter and C# won't notice (though you should change your C# code to use it if you're only retrieving a single scalar value). Please see my answer. –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 21 '12 at 14:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

What you could do is store the output into a table variable:

DECLARE @tmpTable TABLE (ID UNIQUEIDENTIFIER)

INSERT INTO @tmpTable
   EXEC dbo.up_proc2 ..........

and then go from there and use that table variable later on.

share|improve this answer
    
Depends on version of SQL Server - table variables didn't exist in 2000 and you couldn't insert/exec to a table variable in 2005 (Msg 197). –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 21 '12 at 13:19
    
Tried it out.. works perfectly, thx.. I'm not sure yet what sql server version the customer is using. I have 2008. –  TweeZz Feb 21 '12 at 14:13
1  
According to this, it seems to be possible in 2008 and 2005, but not in 2000? –  TweeZz Feb 21 '12 at 14:28
1  
@TweeZz that thread shows success with a #temp table, and failure with a @table variable. There is a difference. It's usually helpful if you specify your version up front, then we don't have to speculate and wonder what you can support and what you can't. –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 21 '12 at 14:55
    
ok, I will specify the version next time. I did try out my code on sql 2005 and it also runs fine! So DECLARE @tmpTable TABLE (ID UNIQUEIDENTIFIER) insert into @tmpTable exec up_insertActivity ... seems to work fine. That thread shows a failure on 2000, right? –  TweeZz Feb 21 '12 at 15:59

You can certainly consume this as an output parameter in proc2 without affecting how your C# code retrieves the eventual resultset.

ALTER PROCEDURE dbo.up_proc2 
    @id_campaign uniqueidentifier, 
    @id_subcampaign uniqueidentifier, 
    @id_lead uniqueidentifier, 
    @offer NVARCHAR(1000) = NULL,
    @fromProc2 UNIQUEIDENTIFER = NULL OUTPUT
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    ...

C# can ignore the new parameter since it is nullable (but since a single output parameter is more efficient than a data reader, you may consider updating your C# code to take advantage of the output parameter later).

Now in proc1:

ALTER PROCEDURE dbo.up_proc1
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    DECLARE @fromProc2 UNIQUEIDENTIFIER;

    EXEC dbo.up_proc2
       --... other parameters ...,
       @fromProc2 = @fromProc2 OUTPUT;

    -- now you can use @fromProc2
END
GO
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Not really an answer to the question, but good to know! –  TweeZz Feb 21 '12 at 14:21
    
Ok, I didn't answer your explicit question, because you ruled out the most sensible way to do it because you thought that would cause problems. I showed you that you can do it the more sensible and efficient way without causing problems. If you had asked how to buy groceries without using money I could have suggested stealing or I could have suggested earning some money. Still not an answer to the question? –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 21 '12 at 15:02
    
No offense, but in the question I ruled out the option to earn some money :) It might be confusing to read the question (without output) and then your answer (with output). I appreciate you showed me the sensible way :) –  TweeZz Feb 21 '12 at 16:07
1  
I don't understand. What does this have to do with money? In the comments you replied that you didn't want to use output parameters because you mistakenly believed that you couldn't add an output parameter without having to modify the C# code that also calls up_proc2. Was that a ruse? –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 21 '12 at 16:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.