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I'd like to take an existing background color of a div element and only adjust opacity... how would I do that?


Found very simple solution to my problem; requires jquery-color plugin but it's by far the best solution in my opinion:

$('#div').css('backgroundColor', $.Color({ alpha: value }));
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Using Jquery UI –  Alfabravo Feb 21 '12 at 12:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Opacity is tricky because there's still no cross-browser supported mechanism, even though its supposed to be in CSS3.

What you most likely want to do is change the background-color style's alpha channel. See: http://robertnyman.com/2010/01/11/css-background-transparency-without-affecting-child-elements-through-rgba-and-filters/


Someone has developed a JQuery plugin that does just what you want: http://archive.plugins.jquery.com/project/backOpacity

With this plugin, you can control just the "back opacity" without affecting child elements.

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The query-color plugin is a nice solution, however I strongly believe you do not need to overload your app with unnecessary plugins for such an easy and short task!

I'd like to offer another approach by using strings.

Add that to your code:

var alpha = "0.8";

var oldBGColor = $('#div').css('backgroundColor'); //e.g. rgb(100,100,100)
var newBGColor = oldBGColor.replace('rgb','rgba').replace(')', ','+alpha+')'); //e.g. rgba(100,100,100,.8)

$('#div').css({'background-color': newBGColor});

Here is a jsFiddle example of how to use it.

I had a similar problem and it worked for me.

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Upload your background image or color in Photoshop and decrease the opaity there and save it as .jpeg image and then use it as the background in HTML.

Simple as that.... :D

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JPEG isn't (usually) used with opacity. Using images is inefficient to start with, but for the specific purpose of having non-binary opacity, I'd say PNG is the way to go. –  Joel Purra Feb 24 '13 at 16:52

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