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The following code illustrates my problem:

struct Base {
    Base(int n) : n(n) {}

    virtual ~Base() = 0;

    int n;
};

Base::~Base() {}

struct A : public virtual Base {
    A(int n) : Base(n) {}

    virtual ~A() = 0;
};

A::~A() {}

struct B : public virtual Base {
    B(int n) : Base(n) {}

    virtual ~B() = 0;
};

B::~B() {}

struct Test : public virtual A, public virtual B {
    Test(int n) : Base(n), A(n), B(n) {} // how to avoid this duplication?
};

int main() {
    Test c(0);
    (void)c;
}

As you can see, the Test constructor must initialize Base, A and B explicitly. Is this normal? Or is there way to avoid the redundancy?

share|improve this question
    
What's your use case? –  Peter Wood Feb 21 '12 at 13:24
    
Experimentation. –  StackedCrooked Feb 21 '12 at 13:56

3 Answers 3

#include <assert.h>

struct Base {
    Base(int n) : n(n) {}

    virtual ~Base() = 0;

    int n;

protected:
    Base() { assert( false ); }
};

Base::~Base() {}

struct A : public virtual Base {
    virtual ~A() = 0;
};

A::~A() {}

struct B : public virtual Base {
    virtual ~B() = 0;
};

B::~B() {}

struct Test : public virtual A, public virtual B {
    Test(int n) : Base(n) {} // how to avoid this duplication?
};

int main() {
    Test c(0);
    (void)c;
}
share|improve this answer
    
On first sight this looks totally wrong, but it does make sense. –  StackedCrooked Feb 21 '12 at 13:18
    
that's pretty creative. –  ApprenticeHacker Feb 21 '12 at 13:20
    
It makes a lot of sense - A is abstract, so will never be the most-derived type of a complete object. The virtually-inherited Base is only ever constructed by the most-derived type. So it's never constructed by A, and if anything it was nonsense to have an initializer for Base in A in the first place. –  Steve Jessop Feb 21 '12 at 13:51

For one, there is no need for Test to derived virtually from A and B in your scenario, since neither A nor B seem to be used as base lasses.

And, yes, Base must be initialized in the most derived class. The reason is simply that the immediate base classes of test share the same Base sub-object. In order to do that, it must be constructed by the most-derived class before either of them is constructed.
Personally, I always thought that A or B could construct it as well, with which does it determined by declaration order as base class, and screw the other's constructor. But that would enable very subtle bugs, when both call different constructors, and the subtle issue of base class declaration order could introduce surprising behavior changes. (Not that we wouldn't have such issues elsewhere in the language, but one less spot is maybe a good thing.)

However, note that, while C++ gives you all the freedom you can possibly get, it's usually best if virtual base classes are abstract classes, have no member data, and thus only a default constructor. Since this will be called implicitly, none of the derived classes will have to bother with calling a constructor explicitly.

share|improve this answer

There's no redundant initialization. Constructors of virtual base classes are called only once, by the most derived class's constructor.

Update The question can be interpreted to mean two things, (1) how to avoid redundant calls to the constructor at runtime and (2) how to avoid writing redundant initialization lists. Apparently the author means (2). I was answering (1).

share|improve this answer
    
But there's redundant typing. –  StackedCrooked Feb 21 '12 at 13:14
    
As a corollary, it is worth thinking about 1) whether you need a non default constructor in the virtual base class 2) whether you need multiple inheritance at all. –  Alexandre C. Feb 21 '12 at 13:15
    
See update. I probably have misunderstood your question :( –  n.m. Feb 21 '12 at 13:30

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