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I'm sending from a .Net application 1404 float values which make up for 5616 bytes through an udp socket. I get no exceptions off this operation.

However, the program receiving those data, is a C++ application, and when receiving such amount of data I get a 10040 message too long error.

Apparently 1480bytes is the longest size possible for messages in Wsock2.

What would be the easiest, cleanest way to fix this?

Thanks!

EDIT: Posting some code:

This is my socket J_Receive class:

#include "J_Receive.h"


#include <stdio.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#if defined (WIN32) && !defined(__CYGWIN__)
#include <winsock.h>
#else
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/uio.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <sys/time.h>
#endif
#include <string.h>

#include <iostream>

using namespace sockets;

J_Recibir::J_Recibir( void )
{
    _port = 0;
    _initialized = false;
    _buffer = 0L;
}

J_Recibir::~J_Recibir( void )
{
#if defined (WIN32) && !defined(__CYGWIN__)
    closesocket( _so);
#else
    close( _so );
#endif
}

bool J_Recibir::init( void )
{
#if defined(WIN32) && !defined(__CYGWIN__)
    WORD version = MAKEWORD(1,1);
    WSADATA wsaData;
    // First, we start up Winsock
    WSAStartup(version, &wsaData);
#endif

    if( _port == 0 )
    {
    fprintf( stderr, "Receiver::init() - port not defined\n" );
    return false;
    }

    if( (_so = socket( AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0 )) < 0 )
    {
        perror( "Socket" );
    return false;
    }



    /*int buffsize  = 50000;
    setsockopt( _so, SOL_SOCKET, SO_RCVBUF, (const char*)&buffsize, sizeof(buffsize));*/

#if defined (WIN32) && !defined(__CYGWIN__)
//    const BOOL on = TRUE;
//    setsockopt( _so, SOL_SOCKET, SO_REUSEADDR, (const char*) &on, sizeof(int));
#else
    int on = 1;
    setsockopt( _so, SOL_SOCKET, SO_REUSEADDR, &on, sizeof(on));
#endif




//    struct sockaddr_in saddr;
    saddr.sin_family = AF_INET;
    saddr.sin_port   = htons( _port );
#if defined (WIN32) && !defined(__CYGWIN__)
    saddr.sin_addr.s_addr =  htonl(INADDR_ANY);
#else
    saddr.sin_addr.s_addr =  0;
#endif

    if( bind( _so, (struct sockaddr *)&saddr, sizeof( saddr )) < 0 )
    {
        perror( "bind" );
        return false;
    }

    u_long iMode = 1;       // 1 para No bloqueante, 0 para bloqueante
    ioctlsocket(_so, FIONBIO, &iMode);

    _initialized = true;
    return _initialized;
}


void J_Recibir::setPort( const short port )
{
    _port = port;
}

void J_Recibir::setBuffer( void *buffer, const unsigned int size )
{
    _buffer = buffer;
    _buffer_size = size;
}

int J_Recibir::sync( void )
{
    if(!_initialized) init();

    if( _buffer == 0L )
    {
        fprintf( stderr, "Receiver::sync() - No buffer\n" );
        return -1;
    }

#if defined(__linux) || defined(__FreeBSD__) || defined( __APPLE__ )
    socklen_t 
#else
    int
#endif
        size = sizeof( struct sockaddr_in );

    fd_set fdset;
    FD_ZERO( &fdset );
    FD_SET( _so, &fdset );

    struct timeval tv;
    tv.tv_sec = 0;
    tv.tv_usec = 0;

#if defined (WIN32) && !defined(__CYGWIN__)
//    saddr.sin_port   = htons( _port );
    recvfrom( _so, (char *)_buffer, _buffer_size, 0, (sockaddr*)&saddr, &size );


//    recvfrom(sock_Receive, szMessage, 256, 0, (sockaddr*)&addr_Cli, &clilen)
    int err = WSAGetLastError ();
    if (err!=0){
        fprintf( stderr, "Receiver::sync() - error %d\n",err );
        perror("Error: ");
    }

    while( select( _so+1, &fdset, 0L, 0L, &tv ) )
    {
        if( FD_ISSET( _so, &fdset ) )
        {
            recvfrom( _so, (char *)_buffer, _buffer_size, 0, (sockaddr*)&saddr, &size );
        }
    }
#else
    recvfrom( _so, (caddr_t)_buffer, _buffer_size, 0, 0, &size );
    while( select( _so+1, &fdset, 0L, 0L, &tv ) )
    {
        if( FD_ISSET( _so, &fdset ) )
        {
            recvfrom( _so, (caddr_t)_buffer, _buffer_size, 0, 0, &size );
        }
    }
#endif

    if (err!=0) return -1;
    else        return 0;
}

And this is how I call the receive function:

     sockets::J_Receiver receiverGUI = new sockets::J_Recibir();
     receiverGUI->setPort(4020);
     nDatosGUI = 1404;
     float* datosGUI = new datosGUI[nDatosGUI ];
     receiverGUI->setBuffer((void *)datosGUI, sizeof(float)*nDatosGUI);
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

WSAEMSGSIZE usually means that the buffer you provided to recvfrom() was smaller than the incoming datagram. Check or post your recvfrom() code to make sure you are using a sufficiently large and correctly declared buffer. Because IPv4 packets can (theoretically) be up to 64 kilobytes in size, it is safest to always use a buffer that large.

share|improve this answer
    
I send from a 1404 float buffer and receive to a 1404 float buffer as well. Shouldn't that be the same size? –  kelmer Feb 22 '12 at 9:06
    
No, your buffer needs to be big enough to handle any datagram which might arrive. Firewalls aside, you could receive any sized datagram from anywhere at any time, not just from your sending program. So at the very least you need to prevent those from choking your receive queue. But it is more likely that you are sending more data than you mean to. It would help to see the code. –  Seth Noble Feb 22 '12 at 15:55
    
You were all right, I was sizing my buffer wrong, now it's properly sized to 5616 bytes, but now the program just hangs forever, does this have to do with blocking sockets? –  kelmer Feb 23 '12 at 9:45
2  
Check the semantics of select(): its return is not a boolean, you need to check it for error, zero, or a count. Also, the first argument should not involve your socket descriptor, it is a count which should be 1 in this case. Finally, calling select with a 0 timeout means it will return immediately regardless of whether there is data is ready. You probably want either NULL to wait indefinitely, or a value like 100ms if you want to watch for some sort of quit signal. In any case, you need to pay attention to the select() return value and handle all three cases. –  Seth Noble Feb 23 '12 at 15:04
1  
The loop is how you read more than one message. select() is intended to block on one or more descriptors until one or more have them becomes available. When it returns, you figure out from its return value and the descriptor sets which descriptors need attention and do whatever you need to do. Typically, you would loop on a control variable, such as while (!Done) which lets you break out when some quit condition occurs or if a fatal error ocurrs. Remember that select() modifies the descriptors sets, so you must reset them every time (or keep a spare copy). –  Seth Noble Feb 23 '12 at 20:16

Reading from the MSDN documentation for error WSAEMSGSIZE (10040):

Message too long.

A message sent on a datagram socket was larger than the internal message buffer or some other network limit, or the buffer used to receive a datagram was smaller than the datagram itself.

This probably means that your receive buffer is too small, and you need to enlarge it. This is done with the setsockopt function and the SO_RCVBUF option.

share|improve this answer
    
So this code should work: int buffsize = 50000; setsockopt( _so, SOL_SOCKET, SO_RCVBUF, &buffsize, sizeof(buffsize)); Yet I can't compile because setsockopt requires a const char* and using a cast does nothing :( –  kelmer Feb 21 '12 at 13:39
    
According to this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/2566915/setsockopt-sys-socket-h Using an int should work, which leaves me puzzled :$ –  kelmer Feb 21 '12 at 13:43
    
@kelmer That should work, you should just cast the parameter: (const char *) &buffsize –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 21 '12 at 13:51
    
I just did, I now get the same 10040 error plus a 10035 resource temporarily unavailable, alternatively... –  kelmer Feb 21 '12 at 13:56
    
Which, now that I tried again, is the same that happened before lol –  kelmer Feb 21 '12 at 13:58

10040 is telling you to use a larger buffer when you call recvfrom(). It does NOT mean for you to increase the size of the socket's internal receive buffer.

Since you already know how many floats you are expecting to receive, simply declare a buffer large enough to receive them all, eg:

float buffer[1404];
int ret = recvfrom(..., (char*)&buffer[0], sizeof(buffer), ...);

Winsock most certainly does NOT have a 1480 byte limit on messages.

share|improve this answer

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