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I used the below codes to dynamically load the html pages in index.html

$.ajax({
    url: "pages/sample.html",
    success: function (data) { 
    $(function() {
             $('html')
            .hide()
            .html(data)
            .fadeIn(500);
             });
    },
             dataType: 'html'
});

Also tried

 $('html').load("pages/menu/page3.html");

All the other contents within body tag are loaded in the resulting page but the css, js files are not shown in the head tag of the resulting page.

Any help really appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
I think jQuery or the browser filter out head. Have you tried document.documentElement.innerHTML = data? –  Felix Kling Feb 21 '12 at 13:17
    
hi felix thanks for reply...since i'm using jquery wat wud be the equivalent..sorry for asking noob question.. –  user1184100 Feb 21 '12 at 13:23
    
It is like Felix and alykhalid says that the browser strips out certain elements. But since you're loading the entire document into the current document one could ask what the point of doing it with ajax is? You still have to fetch the same amount of data and you're replacing the entire document. If all you're after is a fade effect then you can achieve that without ajax by simply fading out the document on a link-click and fading it back in once it's been loaded (starting with it faded out). –  powerbuoy Feb 21 '12 at 13:33

1 Answer 1

The only way I can think of doing this would be parse the data, before you load it into the page. Get all the JS and CSS links from the head element and use JS to dynamically add them to the page.

this will not work

 $('html').load("pages/menu/page3.html");

Since

jQuery uses the browser's .innerHTML property to parse the retrieved document and insert it into the current document. During this process, browsers often filter elements from the document such as <html>, <title>, or <head> elements. As a result, the elements retrieved by .load() may not be exactly the same as if the document were retrieved directly by the browser.

Source: http://api.jquery.com/load/

share|improve this answer
1  
The quote is helpful (it tells us that one has to live with that) but setting the data type to html won't make a difference. –  Felix Kling Feb 21 '12 at 13:27
    
thanks alykhalid...yeah tried the return type..no luck :( –  user1184100 Feb 21 '12 at 13:28
    
I have changed my answer based on the feedback from @FelixKling . Sorry, I dont know hard, it would be do such a think, but this is the only thing I can think off. –  alykhalid Feb 21 '12 at 13:35
    
np alykhalid :) thanks for reply..will try to use a diff method then –  user1184100 Feb 21 '12 at 13:38

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