Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to convert some code from Python to C++ in an effort to gain a little bit of speed and sharpen my rusty C++ skills. Yesterday I was shocked when a naive implementation of reading lines from stdin was much faster in Python than C++ (see this). Today, I finally figured out how to split a string in C++ with merging delimiters (similar semantics to python's split()), and am now experiencing deja vu! My C++ code takes much longer to do the work (though not an order of magnitude more, as was the case for yesterday's lesson).

Python Code:

#!/usr/bin/env python
from __future__ import print_function                                            
import time
import sys

count = 0
start_time = time.time()
dummy = None

for line in sys.stdin:
    dummy = line.split()
    count += 1

delta_sec = int(time.time() - start_time)
print("Python: Saw {0} lines in {1} seconds. ".format(count, delta_sec), end='')
if delta_sec > 0:
    lps = int(count/delta_sec)
    print("  Crunch Speed: {0}".format(lps))
else:
    print('')

C++ Code:

#include <iostream>                                                              
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <time.h>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

void split1(vector<string> &tokens, const string &str,
        const string &delimiters = " ") {
    // Skip delimiters at beginning
    string::size_type lastPos = str.find_first_not_of(delimiters, 0);

    // Find first non-delimiter
    string::size_type pos = str.find_first_of(delimiters, lastPos);

    while (string::npos != pos || string::npos != lastPos) {
        // Found a token, add it to the vector
        tokens.push_back(str.substr(lastPos, pos - lastPos));
        // Skip delimiters
        lastPos = str.find_first_not_of(delimiters, pos);
        // Find next non-delimiter
        pos = str.find_first_of(delimiters, lastPos);
    }
}

void split2(vector<string> &tokens, const string &str, char delim=' ') {
    stringstream ss(str); //convert string to stream
    string item;
    while(getline(ss, item, delim)) {
        tokens.push_back(item); //add token to vector
    }
}

int main() {
    string input_line;
    vector<string> spline;
    long count = 0;
    int sec, lps;
    time_t start = time(NULL);

    cin.sync_with_stdio(false); //disable synchronous IO

    while(cin) {
        getline(cin, input_line);
        spline.clear(); //empty the vector for the next line to parse

        //I'm trying one of the two implementations, per compilation, obviously:
//        split1(spline, input_line);  
        split2(spline, input_line);

        count++;
    };

    count--; //subtract for final over-read
    sec = (int) time(NULL) - start;
    cerr << "C++   : Saw " << count << " lines in " << sec << " seconds." ;
    if (sec > 0) {
        lps = count / sec;
        cerr << "  Crunch speed: " << lps << endl;
    } else
        cerr << endl;
    return 0;

//compiled with: g++ -Wall -O3 -o split1 split_1.cpp

Note that I tried two different split implementations. One (split1) uses string methods to search for tokens and is able to merge multiple tokens as well as handle numerous tokens (it comes from here). The second (split2) uses getline to read the string as a stream, doesn't merge delimiters, and only supports a single delimeter character (that one was posted by several StackOverflow users in answers to string splitting questions).

I ran this multiple times in various orders. My test machine is a Macbook Pro (2011, 8GB, Quad Core), not that it matters much. I'm testing with a 20M line text file with three space-separated columns that each look similar to this: "foo.bar 127.0.0.1 home.foo.bar"

Results:

$ /usr/bin/time cat test_lines_double | ./split.py
       15.61 real         0.01 user         0.38 sys
Python: Saw 20000000 lines in 15 seconds.   Crunch Speed: 1333333
$ /usr/bin/time cat test_lines_double | ./split1
       23.50 real         0.01 user         0.46 sys
C++   : Saw 20000000 lines in 23 seconds.  Crunch speed: 869565
$ /usr/bin/time cat test_lines_double | ./split2
       44.69 real         0.02 user         0.62 sys
C++   : Saw 20000000 lines in 45 seconds.  Crunch speed: 444444

What am I doing wrong? Is there a better way to do string splitting in C++ that does not rely on external libraries (i.e. no boost), supports merging sequences of delimiters (like python's split), is thread safe (so no strtok), and whose performance is at least on par with python?

Edit 1 / Partial Solution?:

I tried making it a more fair comparison by having python reset the dummy list and append to it each time, as C++ does. This still isn't exactly what the C++ code is doing, but it's a bit closer. Basically, the loop is now:

for line in sys.stdin:
    dummy = []
    dummy += line.split()
    count += 1

The performance of python is now about the same as the split1 C++ implementation.

/usr/bin/time cat test_lines_double | ./split5.py
       22.61 real         0.01 user         0.40 sys
Python: Saw 20000000 lines in 22 seconds.   Crunch Speed: 909090

I still am surprised that, even if Python is so optimized for string processing (as Matt Joiner suggested), that these C++ implementations would not be faster. If anyone has ideas about how to do this in a more optimal way using C++, please share your code. (I think my next step will be trying to implement this in pure C, although I'm not going to trade off programmer productivity to re-implement my overall project in C, so this will just be an experiment for string splitting speed.)

Thanks to all for your help.

Final Edit/Solution:

Please see Alf's accepted answer. Since python deals with strings strictly by reference and STL strings are often copied, performance is better with vanilla python implementations. For comparison, I compiled and ran my data through Alf's code, and here is the performance on the same machine as all the other runs, essentially identical to the naive python implementation (though faster than the python implementation that resets/appends the list, as shown in the above edit):

$ /usr/bin/time cat test_lines_double | ./split6
       15.09 real         0.01 user         0.45 sys
C++   : Saw 20000000 lines in 15 seconds.  Crunch speed: 1333333

My only small remaining gripe is regarding the amount of code necessary to get C++ to perform in this case.

One of the lessons here from this issue and yesterday's stdin line reading issue (linked above) are that one should always benchmark instead of making naive assumptions about languages' relative "default" performance. I appreciate the education.

Thanks again to all for your suggestions!

share|improve this question
1  
How did you compile the C++ program? Do you have optimizations turned on? –  interjay Feb 21 '12 at 13:39
    
@interjay: It's in the last comment in his source: g++ -Wall -O3 -o split1 split_1.cpp @JJC: How does your benchmark fare when you actually use dummy and spline respectively, maybe Python removes the call to line.split() because it has no side-effects? –  Eric Feb 21 '12 at 13:40
1  
What results do you get if you remove the splitting, and leave only reading lines from stdin? –  interjay Feb 21 '12 at 13:51
1  
Python is written in C. It means that there is a efficient way of doing it, in C. Maybe there is a better way to split a string than using STL ? –  ixe013 Feb 21 '12 at 13:55
2  
possible duplicate of Why do std::string operations perform poorly? –  Matt Joiner Feb 21 '12 at 14:14

7 Answers 7

up vote 41 down vote accepted

As a guess, Python strings are reference counted immutable strings, so that no strings are copied around in the Python code, while C++ std::string is a mutable value type, and is copied at the smallest opportunity.

If the goal is fast splitting, then one would use constant time substring operations, which means only referring to parts of the original string, as in Python (and Java, and C#…).

The C++ std::string class has one redeeming feature, though: it is standard, so that it can be used to pass strings safely and portably around where efficiency is not a main consideration. But enough chat. Code -- and on my machine this is of course faster than Python, since Python's string handling is implemented in C which is a subset of C++ (he he):

#include <iostream>                                                              
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <time.h>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class StringRef
{
private:
    char const*     begin_;
    int             size_;

public:
    int size() const { return size_; }
    char const* begin() const { return begin_; }
    char const* end() const { return begin_ + size_; }

    StringRef( char const* const begin, int const size )
        : begin_( begin )
        , size_( size )
    {}
};

vector<StringRef> split3( string const& str, char delimiter = ' ' )
{
    vector<StringRef>   result;

    enum State { inSpace, inToken };

    State state = inSpace;
    char const*     pTokenBegin = 0;    // Init to satisfy compiler.
    for( auto it = str.begin(); it != str.end(); ++it )
    {
        State const newState = (*it == delimiter? inSpace : inToken);
        if( newState != state )
        {
            switch( newState )
            {
            case inSpace:
                result.push_back( StringRef( pTokenBegin, &*it - pTokenBegin ) );
                break;
            case inToken:
                pTokenBegin = &*it;
            }
        }
        state = newState;
    }
    if( state == inToken )
    {
        result.push_back( StringRef( pTokenBegin, &*str.end() - pTokenBegin ) );
    }
    return result;
}

int main() {
    string input_line;
    vector<string> spline;
    long count = 0;
    int sec, lps;
    time_t start = time(NULL);

    cin.sync_with_stdio(false); //disable synchronous IO

    while(cin) {
        getline(cin, input_line);
        //spline.clear(); //empty the vector for the next line to parse

        //I'm trying one of the two implementations, per compilation, obviously:
//        split1(spline, input_line);  
        //split2(spline, input_line);

        vector<StringRef> const v = split3( input_line );
        count++;
    };

    count--; //subtract for final over-read
    sec = (int) time(NULL) - start;
    cerr << "C++   : Saw " << count << " lines in " << sec << " seconds." ;
    if (sec > 0) {
        lps = count / sec;
        cerr << "  Crunch speed: " << lps << endl;
    } else
        cerr << endl;
    return 0;
}

//compiled with: g++ -Wall -O3 -o split1 split_1.cpp -std=c++0x

Disclaimer: I hope there aren't any bugs. I haven't tested the functionality, but only checked the speed. But I think, even if there is a bug or two, correcting that won't significantly affect the speed.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, Python strings are reference counted objects, so Python does far less copying. They still contain null-terminated C strings under the hood, though, not (pointer, size) pairs like your code. –  larsmans Feb 21 '12 at 14:54
11  
In other words - for higher level work, like text manipulation, stick to a higher level language, where effort to do it efficiently has been put cumulatively by tens of developers over tens of years - or just prepare to work as much as all those developers for having something comparable in lower level. –  jsbueno Feb 21 '12 at 18:04
1  
@JJC: for the StringRef, you can copy the substring to a std::string very easily, just string( sr.begin(), sr.end() ). –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 22 '12 at 14:59
2  
I wish CPython strings were copied less. Yes, they are reference counted and immutable but str.split() allocates new strings for each item using PyString_FromStringAndSize() that calls PyObject_MALLOC(). So there is no optimization with a shared representation that exploits that the strings are immutable in Python. –  J.F. Sebastian Aug 10 '12 at 16:14
1  
Maintainers: please do not introduce bugs by attempting to fix perceived bugs (especially not with reference to cplusplus.com). TIA. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 12 at 5:26

I'm not providing any better solutions (at least performance-wise), but some additional data that could be interesting.

Using strtok_r (reentrant variant of strtok):

void splitc1(vector<string> &tokens, const string &str,
        const string &delimiters = " ") {
    char *saveptr;
    char *cpy, *token;

    cpy = (char*)malloc(str.size() + 1);
    strcpy(cpy, str.c_str());

    for(token = strtok_r(cpy, delimiters.c_str(), &saveptr);
        token != NULL;
        token = strtok_r(NULL, delimiters.c_str(), &saveptr)) {
        tokens.push_back(string(token));
    }

    free(cpy);
}

Additionally using character strings for parameters, and fgets for input:

void splitc2(vector<string> &tokens, const char *str,
        const char *delimiters) {
    char *saveptr;
    char *cpy, *token;

    cpy = (char*)malloc(strlen(str) + 1);
    strcpy(cpy, str);

    for(token = strtok_r(cpy, delimiters, &saveptr);
        token != NULL;
        token = strtok_r(NULL, delimiters, &saveptr)) {
        tokens.push_back(string(token));
    }

    free(cpy);
}

And, in some cases, where destroying the input string is acceptable:

void splitc3(vector<string> &tokens, char *str,
        const char *delimiters) {
    char *saveptr;
    char *token;

    for(token = strtok_r(str, delimiters, &saveptr);
        token != NULL;
        token = strtok_r(NULL, delimiters, &saveptr)) {
        tokens.push_back(string(token));
    }
}

The timings for these are as follows (including my results for the other variants from the question and the accepted answer):

split1.cpp:  C++   : Saw 20000000 lines in 31 seconds.  Crunch speed: 645161
split2.cpp:  C++   : Saw 20000000 lines in 45 seconds.  Crunch speed: 444444
split.py:    Python: Saw 20000000 lines in 33 seconds.  Crunch Speed: 606060
split5.py:   Python: Saw 20000000 lines in 35 seconds.  Crunch Speed: 571428
split6.cpp:  C++   : Saw 20000000 lines in 18 seconds.  Crunch speed: 1111111

splitc1.cpp: C++   : Saw 20000000 lines in 27 seconds.  Crunch speed: 740740
splitc2.cpp: C++   : Saw 20000000 lines in 22 seconds.  Crunch speed: 909090
splitc3.cpp: C++   : Saw 20000000 lines in 20 seconds.  Crunch speed: 1000000

As we can see, the solution from the accepted answer is still fastest.

For anyone who would want to do further tests, I also put up a Github repo with all the programs from the question, the accepted answer, this answer, and additionally a Makefile and a script to generate test data: https://github.com/tobbez/string-splitting.

share|improve this answer
    
I did a pull request ( github.com/tobbez/string-splitting/pull/2 ) that makes the test a little more realistic by "using" the data (counting number of words and characters). With this change, all of the C/C++ versions beat the Python versions (expect for the one based on Boost's tokenizer that I added) and the real value of "string view" based methods (like that of split6) shine. –  Dave Johansen Apr 15 at 5:22

You're making the mistaken assumption that your chosen C++ implementation is necessarily faster than Python's. String handling in Python is highly optimized. See this question for more: Why do std::string operations perform poorly?

share|improve this answer
4  
I'm not making any claims about overall language performance, only about my particular code. So, no assumptions here. Thanks for the good pointer to the other question. I'm not sure if you're saying that this particular implementation in C++ is suboptimal (your first sentence) or that C++ is just slower than Python in string processing (your second sentence). Also, if you know of a fast way to do what I'm trying to do in C++ please share it for everyone's benefit. Thanks. Just to clarify, I love python, but I'm no blind fanboy, which is why I'm trying to learn the fastest way to do this. –  JJC Feb 21 '12 at 14:25
1  
@JJC: Given that Python's implementation is faster, I'd say yours is suboptimal. Keep in mind that language implementations can cut corners for you, but ultimately algorithmic complexity and hand optimizations win out. In this case, Python has the upper hand for this use case by default. –  Matt Joiner Feb 22 '12 at 2:49

I suspect that this is because of the way std::vector gets resized during the process of a push_back() function call. If you try using std::list or std::vector::reserve() to reserve enough space for the sentences, you should get a much better performance. Or you could use a combination of both like below for split1():

void split1(vector<string> &tokens, const string &str,
        const string &delimiters = " ") {
    // Skip delimiters at beginning
    string::size_type lastPos = str.find_first_not_of(delimiters, 0);

    // Find first non-delimiter
    string::size_type pos = str.find_first_of(delimiters, lastPos);
    list<string> token_list;

    while (string::npos != pos || string::npos != lastPos) {
        // Found a token, add it to the list
        token_list.push_back(str.substr(lastPos, pos - lastPos));
        // Skip delimiters
        lastPos = str.find_first_not_of(delimiters, pos);
        // Find next non-delimiter
        pos = str.find_first_of(delimiters, lastPos);
    }
    tokens.assign(token_list.begin(), token_list.end());
}

EDIT: The other obvious thing I see is that Python variable dummy gets assigned each time but not modified. So it's not a fair comparison against C++. You should try modifying your Python code to be dummy = [] to initialize it and then do dummy += line.split(). Can you report the runtime after this?

EDIT2: To make it even more fair can you modify the while loop in C++ code to be:

    while(cin) {
        getline(cin, input_line);
        std::vector<string> spline; // create a new vector

        //I'm trying one of the two implementations, per compilation, obviously:
//        split1(spline, input_line);  
        split2(spline, input_line);

        count++;
    };
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the idea. I implemented it and this implementation is actually slower than the original split1, unfortunately. I also tried spline.reserve(16) before the loop, but this had no impact on my split1's speed. There are only three tokens per line, and the vector is cleared after each line, so I didn't expect that to help much. –  JJC Feb 21 '12 at 14:11
    
I tried your edit as well. Please see the updated question. Performance is now on-par with split1. –  JJC Feb 21 '12 at 14:54
    
I tried your EDIT2. The performance was a bit worse : $/usr/bin/time cat test_lines_double | ./split7 33.39 real 0.01 user 0.49 sys C++ : Saw 20000000 lines in 33 seconds. Crunch speed: 606060 –  JJC Feb 21 '12 at 15:30
void split5(vector<string> &tokens, const string &str, char delim=' ') {

    enum { do_token, do_delim } state = do_delim;
    int idx = 0, tok_start = 0;
    for (string::const_iterator it = str.begin() ; ; ++it, ++idx) {
        switch (state) {
            case do_token:
                if (it == str.end()) {
                    tokens.push_back (str.substr(tok_start, idx-tok_start));
                    return;
                }
                else if (*it == delim) {
                    state = do_delim;
                    tokens.push_back (str.substr(tok_start, idx-tok_start));
                }
                break;

            case do_delim:
                if (it == str.end()) {
                    return;
                }
                if (*it != delim) {
                    state = do_token;
                    tok_start = idx;
                }
                break;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks n.m.! Unfortunately, this seems to run at about the same speed as the original (split 1) implementation on my dataset and machine: $ /usr/bin/time cat test_lines_double | ./split8 21.89 real 0.01 user 0.47 sys C++ : Saw 20000000 lines in 22 seconds. Crunch speed: 909090 –  JJC Feb 22 '12 at 9:14
    
On my machine: split1 — 54s , split.py — 35s, split5 — 16s. I have no idea. –  n.m. Feb 22 '12 at 10:28
    
Hmm, does your data match the format I noted above? I assume you ran each several times to eliminate transient effects like initial disk cache population? –  JJC Feb 22 '12 at 11:26

If you take the split1 implementaion and change the signature to more closely match that of split2, by changing this:

void split1(vector<string> &tokens, const string &str, const string &delimiters = " ")

to this:

void split1(vector<string> &tokens, const string &str, const char delimiters = ' ')

You get a more dramatic difference between split1 and split2, and a fairer comparison:

split1  C++   : Saw 10000000 lines in 41 seconds.  Crunch speed: 243902
split2  C++   : Saw 10000000 lines in 144 seconds.  Crunch speed: 69444
split1' C++   : Saw 10000000 lines in 33 seconds.  Crunch speed: 303030
share|improve this answer

I suspect that this is related to buffering on sys.stdin in Python, but no buffering in the C++ implementation.

See this post for details on how to change the buffer size, then try the comparison again: Setting smaller buffer size for sys.stdin?

share|improve this answer
1  
Hmmm... I don't follow. Just reading lines (without the split) is faster in C++ than Python (after including the cin.sync_with_stdio(false); line). That was the issue I had yesterday, referenced above. –  JJC Feb 21 '12 at 14:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.