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I'm currently using com.google.common.io.ByteArrayDataInput in my code. What I'm writing is a sort of loader for a binary file. Unfortunately, ByteArrayDataInput does not provide the information how many bytes left in its internal byte array. Is there any alternative to this class that provides such infomation? I know I can write my own wrapper class for com.google.common.io.ByteArrayDataInput, but I'd like to avoid that.

EDIT

The problem is that the reference to my com.google.common.io.ByteArrayDataInput instance is passed very deeply through a chain of methods. It looks like this:

loadA(ByteArrayDataInput in) invokes loadB(in) which invokes loadC(in); and so forth..

every of loadX() methods reads something from in. And I would like to invoke ByteArrayDataInput.readFully() method in loadC() and I would like to check at that level how many bytes left to read. To achieve that with this class I would need to pass bytesLeft info through all the loadX() methods.

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Well, you know the file size, if you just count the bytes already read you get the bytes left! Which is the implementing class you are using? – vulkanino Feb 21 '12 at 14:04
    
@vulkanino: see my edit – Lukasz Feb 21 '12 at 14:15
    
Help me out here - other than not throwing exceptions, what does ByteArrayDataInput offer that an ObjectInputStream wrapping a ByteArrayInputStream does not? Maybe I just need my morning coffee, but I don't see any meaningful differences. – cutchin Feb 21 '12 at 14:24
    
@cutchin: you're right... I'm heavily using methods such as: readByte(), readUnsignedByte(), readShort(), readUnsignedShort() from ByteArrayDataInput. but I can see them in ObjectInputStream class. Thanks! – Lukasz Feb 21 '12 at 14:28

ByteArrayInputStream's available method returns the number of bytes left in the array according to the source. Wrapping that in an ObjectInputStream would seem to give you just about the same functionality. ObjectInputStream's available() method returns available() from the underlying input stream without doing any processing.

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There's one issue with your approach. ObjectInputStream should go together with ObjectOutputStream and I don't want such serialization in my code. I'm simply getting a raw array of bytes. – Lukasz Feb 21 '12 at 17:48
    
Actually, DataInputStream has mostly the same methods as well, and isn't tied to anything serialization-related. It uses "modified UTF-8" which is mostly relevant if you have nulls in your strings. I'm not certain if that's the same as the Guava library. – cutchin Feb 22 '12 at 18:13
    
Well, I really thought ObjectInputStream would resolve my problems, however, I ran into other issues: stackoverflow.com/questions/9381521/… – Lukasz Feb 22 '12 at 21:15
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I had to prepare my own wrapper class for Guava ByteArrayDataInputWrapper. It adds a new method getAvailable() which returns the number of bytes left to read.

public class ByteArrayDataInputWrapper implements ByteArrayDataInput {

    private static final int INT_LENGTH = 4;
    private static final int FLOAT_LENGTH = 4;  
    private static final int LONG_LENGTH = 8;
    private static final int DOUBLE_LENGTH = 8; 

    private ByteArrayDataInput in;
    private int available;

    public ByteArrayDataInputWrapper(byte[] binary) {
        if (binary != null) {
            in = ByteStreams.newDataInput(binary);
            available = binary.length;
        }
    }

    public int getAvailable() {
        return available;
    }   

    @Override
    public void readFully(byte[] b) {
        in.readFully(b);
        available -= b.length;
    }

    @Override
    public void readFully(byte[] b, int off, int len) {
        in.readFully(b, off, len);
        available -= len;
    }

    @Override
    public int skipBytes(int n) {
        int skipped = in.skipBytes(n);
        available -= skipped;
        return skipped;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean readBoolean() {
        boolean result = in.readBoolean();
        available--;
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public byte readByte() {
        byte result = in.readByte();
        available--;
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public int readUnsignedByte() {
        int result = in.readUnsignedByte();
        available--;
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public short readShort() { 
        short result = in.readShort(); 
        available -= 2;
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public int readUnsignedShort() {
        int result = in.readUnsignedShort();
        available -= 2;
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public char readChar() {
        char result = in.readChar();
        available -= 2;
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public int readInt() {
        int result = in.readInt();
        available -= INT_LENGTH;
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public long readLong() {
        long result = in.readLong();
        available -= LONG_LENGTH;
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public float readFloat() {
        float result = in.readFloat();
        available -= FLOAT_LENGTH;
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public double readDouble() {
        double result = in.readDouble();
        available -= DOUBLE_LENGTH;
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public String readLine() {
        String result = in.readLine();
        if (result != null) {
            available -= result.length();
        }
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public String readUTF() {
        String result = in.readUTF();
        if (result != null) {
            available -= result.length();
        }
        return result;
    }

}
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