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What's the difference between initialization within a static block:

public class staticTest {

    static String s;
    static int n;
    static double d;

    static {
        s = "I'm static";
        n = 500;
        d = 4000.0001;
    }
    ...

And individual static initialization:

public class staticTest {

    static String s = "I'm static";
    static int n    = 500;
    static double d = 4000.0001;

    ....
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1  
You're only using assignments in the static initialization block, so of course those could be done using static variable assignment. Have you tried seeing what happens if you need to execute non-assignment statements? –  Platinum Azure Feb 21 '12 at 14:40
    
It is a good place to load classes or load native library. –  qrtt1 Feb 21 '12 at 14:43

8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

A static initialization blocks allows more complex initialization, for example using conditionals:

static double a;
static {
    if (SomeCondition) {
      a = 0;
    } else {
      a = 1;
    }
}

Or when more than just construction is required: when using a builder to create your instance, exception handling or work other than creating static fields is necessary.

A static initialization block also runs after the inline static initializers, so the following is valid:

static double a;
static double b = 1;

static {
    a = b * 4; // Evaluates to 4
}
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Doing "b = a * 4;" inline would only be a problem if b were declared before a, which is not the case in your example. –  George Hawkins Feb 24 '12 at 8:44
    
@GeorgeHawkins I was only trying illustrate that a static initialiser runs after inline initialisers, not that an equivalent couldn't be done inline. However, I take your point and have updated the example to (hopefully) be clearer. –  rich.okelly Feb 24 '12 at 9:26

A typical usage:

private final static Set<String> SET = new HashSet<String>();

static {
    SET.add("value1");
    SET.add("value2");
    SET.add("value3");
}

How would you do it without static initializer?

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2  
Answer: Guava :) +1 –  Paul Bellora Feb 21 '12 at 14:55
    
@PaulBellora :P –  gawi Feb 21 '12 at 15:17

Exception handling during initialization is another reason. For example:

static URL url;
static {
    try {
        url = new URL("https://blahblah.com");
    }
    catch (MalformedURLException mue) {
        //log exception or handle otherwise
    }
}

This is useful for constructors that annoyingly throw checked exceptions, like above, or else more complex initialization logic that might be exception-prone.

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In your example, there is no difference; but often the initial value is more complex than is comfortably expressed in a single expression (e.g., it's a List<String> whose contents are best expressed by a for-loop; or it's a Method that might not exist, so exception-handlers are needed), and/or the static fields need to be set in a specific order.

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Sometimes you want to do more than just assign values to static variables. Since you cannot put arbitrary statements in the class body, you could use a static initializer block.

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Technically, you could get away without it. Some prefer multiline initialisation code to go into a static method. I'm quite happy using a static initialiser for relatively simple multistatement initialisation.

Of course, I'd almost always make my statics final and point to an unmodifiable object.

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static block can be used to initialize singleton instance, to prevent using synchronized getInstance() method.

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The static code block enables to initialize the fields with more than instuction, initialize fields in a different order of the declarations and also could be used for conditional intialization.

More specifically,

static final String ab = a+b;
static final String a = "Hello,";
static final String b = ", world";

will not work because a and b are declared after ab.

However I could use a static init. block to overcome this.

static final String ab;
static final String a;
static final String b;

static {
  b = ", world";
  a = "Hello";
  ab = a + b;
}

static final String ab;
static final String a;
static final String b;

static {
  b = (...) ? ", world" : ", universe";
  a = "Hello";
  ab = a + b;
}
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2  
While what you are saying is true, it does not demonstrate the necessity of static initializer block. You can just move you ab declaration below the declaration of b. –  gawi Feb 21 '12 at 14:50

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