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This code causes some kind of memory leak. I assume it's caused by the new byte[]. But shouldn't the GC avoiding this? If the program runs long enough, the code will cause a OutOfMemoryException

using (var file = new FileStream(fileLoc, FileMode.Open))
{
    int chunkSize = 1024 * 100;
    while (file.Position < file.Length)
    {
        if (file.Length - file.Position < chunkSize)
        {
            chunkSize = (int)(file.Length - file.Position);
        }
        byte[] chunk = new byte[chunkSize];
        file.Read(chunk, 0, chunkSize);
        context.Response.BinaryWrite(chunk);
    }
}
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What is context? –  Philip Fourie Feb 21 '12 at 15:09
    
HttpContext context; –  chriszero Feb 21 '12 at 15:12
1  
Did you use a profiler to identify this code as the culprit? –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 21 '12 at 15:15
    
No profiler, but if I comment the code, the error is gone. –  chriszero Feb 21 '12 at 15:28
    
How big is the file? –  user159335 Feb 21 '12 at 15:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is almost certainly that you're repeatedly allocating new arrays and in memory they're allocated as contiguous blocks, so I can understand how it's chewing through it.

How about rejigging things slightly so that you only create the buffer once and then reuse it unless you get into the if where the chunksize required is less than the standard chunk size.

using (var file = new FileStream(fileLoc, FileMode.Open)) {
    int chunkSize = 1024 * 100;
    byte[] chunk = new byte[chunkSize];

    while (file.Position < file.Length) {
        if (file.Length - file.Position < chunkSize) {
            chunkSize = (int)(file.Length - file.Position);
            chunk = new byte[chunkSize];
        }
        file.Read(chunk, 0, chunkSize);
        context.Response.BinaryWrite(chunk);
    } 
}
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Sounds like what I said earlier about newing something up in a While loop or for loop... good catch Nanhydrin I will +1 you now –  DJ KRAZE Feb 21 '12 at 15:46

The GC does not stipulate WHEN items will be removed generally.

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2  
The IDisposable mechanism and the garbage collector are entirely independent. –  Justin Feb 21 '12 at 15:10
    
I realize that, does that make active memory management a less valid approach somehow? –  Grant H. Feb 21 '12 at 15:14
1  
The garbage collector should still be run before the allocation system throws out of memory no matter how lazy it is. –  user159335 Feb 21 '12 at 15:17
    
Very true, there's something else at play in the OP's code. –  Grant H. Feb 21 '12 at 15:20

I assume

You know what they say about that. Make sure you find the source of the exception. Might it be caused by disconnecting clients, which cause your send buffer to fill with data that keeps being read but is never sent?

See here:

try
{
    // Open the file.
    iStream = new System.IO.FileStream(filepath, System.IO.FileMode.Open, 
                System.IO.FileAccess.Read,System.IO.FileShare.Read);


    // Total bytes to read:
    dataToRead = iStream.Length;

    Response.ContentType = "application/octet-stream";
    Response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", "attachment; filename=" + filename);

    // Read the bytes.
    while (dataToRead > 0)
    {
        // Verify that the client is connected.
        if (Response.IsClientConnected) 
        {
            // Read the data in buffer.
            length = iStream.Read(buffer, 0, 10000);

            // Write the data to the current output stream.
            Response.OutputStream.Write(buffer, 0, length);

            // Flush the data to the HTML output.
            Response.Flush();

            buffer= new Byte[10000];
            dataToRead = dataToRead - length;
        }
        else
        {
            //prevent infinite loop if user disconnects
            dataToRead = -1;
        }
    }
}
catch (Exception ex) 
{
    // Trap the error, if any.
    Response.Write("Error : " + ex.Message);
}
finally
{
    if (iStream != null) 
    {
        //Close the file.
        iStream.Close();
    }

    Response.Close();
}
share|improve this answer
    
@DJKRAZE where am I incorrect? If you refer to my edit, please see Stream.Close(): "This method calls Dispose, specifying true to release all resources". –  CodeCaster Feb 21 '12 at 15:55
    
Incorrect in the fact that I stated earlier that he probably has an issue somewhere in a While Loop or a forloop and it was in the byte[] within his while loop he kept creating a new instance inside the loop where he should have declared the instance once outside the loop ..but I will delete my comment under your code.. –  DJ KRAZE Feb 21 '12 at 15:57
1  
@DJKRAZE any variable declared in a loop goes out of scope when the loop is exited and hence is garbage collected... Although I never commented on that statement. –  CodeCaster Feb 21 '12 at 15:59
    
I think this is probably the right answer, he's filling up the send buffer and the allocations are just confusing the situation. –  user159335 Feb 21 '12 at 16:00
1  
@CodeCaster Correction: any variable declared in a loop goes out of scope when the loop is exited and hence the object it refers to becomes eligible for garbage collection. (With the additional condition that this is only true if there are no more references to it elsewhere.) –  phoog Feb 21 '12 at 16:26

I'm not entirely sure what you mean by "runs long enough" however that code allocates an array that is at least 100 KB (possibly larger if the file is larger). In itself this probably won't cause a failure however in an environment with only 32 MB of virtual address space this is a reasonably large allocation of memory. If there are many of these running in parallel this could easily multiply that up to a relatively high memory usage in which case you may see an OutOfMemoryException.

With the assumption that context.Response is a HttpResponse it looks like you are just trying to write the contents of a file to a HTTP response in which case you can do this far more efficiently using something like the following:

using (var file = new FileStream(fileLoc, FileMode.Open))
{
    CopyStream(file, context.Response.OutputStream);
}

See Best way to copy between two Stream instances - C# for an implementation of CopyStream that copies data bit-by-bit in smaller chunks rather than attempting to read the entire file in one go.

share|improve this answer
    
It's a 100KB array, actually. –  ken2k Feb 21 '12 at 15:20
    
@ken2k Thanks, silly mistake - fixed. –  Justin Feb 21 '12 at 15:23
    
Justin how big is your code is it possible to post the code so that we can clarify if there are any memory leaks really going on.. there are a lot of great opinions and views being posted but I think that we are all truly flying blind so to speak without seeing more code.. I am sure that this is not the only place in your code where you are creating instances of Objects, arrays, etc... thanks –  DJ KRAZE Feb 21 '12 at 15:27

May I suggest that you try with a smaller buffer size?

The problem could be that you're repeatedly allocating a memory block that is larger than 85000 bytes and that goes to a special heap (Large Object Heap) that unfortunately is never compacted!

See here for a detailed explanation of how the Large Object Heap works. This unfortunately can lead to severe heap fragmentation and ultimately cause an out of memory error like the one you're describing (see here: loh fragmentation causes OutOfMemory exception)

If you allocate smaller chunks (smaller than 85,000 bytes) then they will be allocated on the regular heap, then the GC will be able to perform compaction and almost certainly, your problem will be gone. I would also strongly recommend you modify your code as suggested by @Nanhydrin, since this avoids repeated allocations and should perform slightly better

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