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I see two differents way for declaring variables when making a "for loop" in javascript:

First way:

for (var i = 0, l = [].length; i < l; i += 1) {
    // make something
}

Second way:

var i;
var l;
for (i = 0, l = [].length; i < l; i += 1) {
    // make something
}

Is there some reason to prefer one of these?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

They are same, you can use either BUT first is more readable and terse.

The point is that variables in both cases are local with the presence of var keyword. With first method also, you create two local variables:

var i, l

Instead of

var i
var l

Why use var keyword again and again when only one can do it. In fact that turns out to be one of the good practices of JS.

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Given the code you show, they are the same thing. However, JS has some oddities which could cause issues in more complex code. Also, there is a question of maintainability and readability for future devs. Some of it is very subjective, some of it is objective.

I use a combination of the two, with slight variation--single var statement, top of scope.

var x = function () {
    var i,
      l;

    for (i = 0, l = [].length; i < l; i += 1) {
        // make something
    }
};

The reason being that I prefer a single var statement per scope (function), and that statement to be at the top of the scope. JSLint/JSHint enforce this by default. Objectively, it helps avoid issues with the JS hoisting mechanism, which moves all variable declarations to the top of scope during the pre-execution pass. Admittedly subjectively, it makes very clear to later developers which variables are introduced in this scope. Any other var in use in the scope is assumed to be coming from a higher-level scope.

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His first method also uses single var which is same as what you have done. –  Sarfraz Feb 21 '12 at 15:16
1  
@Sarfraz Single var statement for the whole function, not just the loop. –  James McLaughlin Feb 21 '12 at 15:16
    
@Sarfraz True, but not at the top of the scope, which is why I said it the way I did. I will edit to say I use a combination of the two... –  JAAulde Feb 21 '12 at 15:17
    
@JAAulde: Ok makes sense then but loop-oriented vars shouldn't be defined on top I suppose. –  Sarfraz Feb 21 '12 at 15:18
    
@Sarfraz I always declare them at the top, and sometimes define them at the top as well. Just depends. –  JAAulde Feb 21 '12 at 15:19
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In javascript there is no difference except from a maintainability point of view. keeping declarations and usage close by helps in better readability. You should choose which ever is more readable.

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No, both those are correct. I prefer the first myself.

An incorrect way is:

for (var i = l = 0; ...; ...) {
    ...
}

Where there is no comma between i and l wich causes l to be global.

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No, at least in Chrome the scope is exactly the same and both ways are equivalent.

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actually according to the almighty crockford there is: because javascript has function scope it is preferred to always declare variables first thing in the head of the function.

However, as others have pointed out, it doesnt really matter and should be done according to personal taste and readability.

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The reason why one would prefer the second over the first is that variables in JS don't have block scope, but instead lexical (or function) scope, which means that variable are visible within the function they are defined (they are also visible in nested functions).

Example:

function foo() {
    for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        alert(i);
    }

    alert(i); // works, because i has lexical scope
}

In most C-like languages, variables have block scope, which means they are visible within the block where they are defined, so:

void foo() {
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        print(i);
    }
}

print(i); // won't work, i is not visible any more

So, people coming from languages like Java/C/C++ may think that var i in the first example has block scope, where it actually has not. This is why some programmers prefer declaring all variables at the beginning of functions.

Personally I think even then you should stick to the habit to declare variables as close as possible to where they are used.

EDIT

As JAAulde mentioned, you should only declare variables close to their usage if you've really understood JS scoping rules (and quirks).

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The only problem with sticking to "declare close to usage" is that JS is not C. JS has a hoisting mechanism which is an oddity that can cause issues when var declaration is done all over the place without proper understanding of the mechanism. –  JAAulde Feb 21 '12 at 15:33
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