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// reading                        
if((shmid = shmget(key, 0, 0)) < 0) {                  
    perror("shmget");                
    exit(50); 
}                                                         

// attach                                                 
if((data = shmat(shmid, (void *)0, 0)) == (char *) -1) {        
    perror("shmat");                                      
    exit(100);                                            
}

// get memory size
struct shmid_ds shm_info;
size_t shm_size;
int shm_rc;
if((shm_rc = shmctl(shmid, IPC_STAT, &shm_info)) < 0)
    exit(101);
shm_size = shm_info.shm_segsz;

Sometimes data is not null terminated and calling strlen(data) causes segfaults...

So I was trying to make sure that it is null terminated by making

data[shm_size] = '\0';

But now sometimes it fails on that line of code.

What I'm doing wrong?

EDIT: Thanks for your support! I think after your explanation about the strlen() + 1 == shm_size I have changed the rest of my code not posted here and seems to be fine. I'm waiting for new segfaults and hopefully I will not get any ;)

share|improve this question
    
show me how you defined and allocated space for the data. problem caused by a incorrect memory allocation i guess. you probably need +1 bytes more space for data array. –  Emir Akaydın Feb 21 '12 at 15:17
    
Yes, you're calling string functions on things that aren't strings. There's the first problem, which suggests you need to read a lot more before you begin tackling the rest of this issue. –  tbert Feb 21 '12 at 15:31
    
The shared memory is being populated by PHP using shmop... and I'm sure that it contains strings, because when I'm checking the core dump with gdb I can see the contents of data... –  edo888 Feb 21 '12 at 15:34
    
can you see the size too? GDB may only show you the amount of data you specified (like x/3xb gives you only 3 byte). even the "print" function may not always check the size of the string but prints to the '\0' character, which may be accidently after your "string" and so it seems, it is NULL terminated. –  Hayt Feb 21 '12 at 16:03
    
No, after making gdb> set print elements 0, in the end of the text I can see address xxx out of bounds error... –  edo888 Feb 21 '12 at 16:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

data[shm_size] is one beyond the end. You should, instead, do data[shm_size-1], and only if shm_size != 0.

But nevertheless, calling strlen() makes only sense if you really have put a string inside it. Otherwise, it might return any value < shm_size if there happens to be a \0 character.

share|improve this answer
    
If everything is OK with the shared memory and it is null terminated, shouldn't strlen(data) == shm_size? –  edo888 Feb 21 '12 at 15:33
    
@edo888 No. If the memory area is uninitialized, it might contain any random garbage which might, as written, contain \0 chars which stop the counting. –  glglgl Feb 21 '12 at 15:44
    
OK, thanks for the clarification! –  edo888 Feb 21 '12 at 15:59

Arrays are 0-origin, you want:

data[shm_size - 1] = '\0';
share|improve this answer
    
Making that, it uses 100% CPU always... Please note that my code works like a charm almost always... But there are cases when it segfaults... –  edo888 Feb 21 '12 at 15:18
3  
@edo888: be sure that shm_size is greater than zero. if it becomes zero, that might be the reason of 100% CPU usage. –  Emir Akaydın Feb 21 '12 at 15:20
    
If everything is OK with the shared memory and it is null terminated, shouldn't strlen(data) == shm_size? –  edo888 Feb 21 '12 at 15:41

first: the memory has not to be null terminated. it is undefined at the beginning. you might want to consider using

memset(data,0,shm_size);

and second:

data[shm_size] = '\0';

is wrong by one index. arrays begin at zero so you should use

data[shm_size-1] = '\0';
share|improve this answer
    
Memory is always populated. I'm just reading from it. If everything is OK with the shared memory, shouldn't strlen(data) == shm_size? –  edo888 Feb 21 '12 at 15:29
    
shm_size would be strlen(data)+1 because you have the '\0' character in the end. –  Hayt Feb 21 '12 at 15:42
    
@edo888: Memory is not always populated, and you have no control over whether there is memory past the end of your shared memory block or what that memory would contain. Reading from it (e.g. via strlen) is undefined behavior. Yes the contents of a new shared memory buffer will initially be all-zeros, but you're not asking about the contents of the buffer; you're asking about the contents of memory immediately past the end of the buffer. –  R.. Feb 21 '12 at 15:52
    
Thanks for the clarification! –  edo888 Feb 21 '12 at 16:01

The assignment of the null termination character:

data[shm_size] = '\0';

is writing past the end of the allocated memory, which is undefined behavior. If it the buffer has character data of length shm_size, then it will be necessary to copy it to another buffer in order to null terminate it.

share|improve this answer
    
If everything is OK with the shared memory and it is null terminated, shouldn't strlen(data) == shm_size? –  edo888 Feb 21 '12 at 15:31
    
No, the only way strlen(data) could return shm_size is if you've invoked undefined behavior, e.g. by calling strlen on a buffer that's not null terminated. Like all string buffers, you need to account for the null termination when choosing the buffer length. –  R.. Feb 21 '12 at 15:51

By doing

`data[shm_size] = '\0';` 

you're actually accessing a memory region outside the bounds of the shared memory ... the data[index_value] syntax on a pointer pointing to a raw memory block is the same as saying

*(data + index_value*sizeof(unsigned char))  

Thus data[0] will dereference and return the value at the first memory address in the shared memory segment, and data[shm_size] will do the same at and address past the end of the shared-memory segment.

share|improve this answer
    
If everything is OK with the shared memory, shouldn't strlen(data) == shm_size? –  edo888 Feb 21 '12 at 15:32
    
No, because strlen() does not include the NULL-terminating value. Thus the actual minimum size of a memory block needed to store a zero-terminated string needs to be equal to strlen() + 1. –  Jason Feb 21 '12 at 15:35
    
Thanks for clarification! –  edo888 Feb 21 '12 at 16:01

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